July in Boston, USA

 

Take classes at the diverse and prestigious Boston University, on a campus in a superb location with accessible and economical transport available to explore the region. Boston offers an incredible setting for the US summer, combining heaps of culture and history while also providing countless social and adventure opportunities.

Program Overview

Spend 6 weeks studying at one of the best universities in the world. Gain credit while experiencing a global city and campus experience second to none.

In 2018, Boston University (BU) was ranked 37th of National Universities by US News. It is one of the oldest universities in the United States and boasts notable alumni like Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

As a BU ‘summer’ (July) session student you have access to hundreds of academic courses. With on-campus accommodation and all of the university facilities, including modern fitness centre, eateries, an arena for sports and concerts, art galleries, museums and libraries – you have access to everything you need.

Start getting excited about:

Having the opportunity to be part of a university that is ranked among the top 15 percent in the world! With the ideal location in the heart of Boston, this is a uni that students dream about attending – and as a CISaustralia student you now have that opportunity.

Choose to study from a multitude of disciplines, including: business; management; finance; accounting; humanities; arts; social science; sociology; anthropology; history; communications; journalism; health and health-related fields; IT; and engineering.

BU has everything you could need to have an interesting and fun-filled Aussie winter (US summer). Beginning with its urban landscape and impressive architecture, the campus is an experience in itself. Not only is BU academically rewarding, it is also a great place to spend six weeks with its modern residential halls (accommodation), libraries, world-class athletic facilities and a multitude of entertainment opportunities.

Living and studying in one of the oldest cities in the United States – Boston. The city is a cultural and historical mecca serving the United States with the first public school, Latin School, and first subway system. The city is considered to be a world leader in innovation, technology, education and serves as an anchor for the greater New England region. The bay provides a nice breeze on warm summer days in Boston, and offers cool and calm shorelines.

You can study in a welcoming environment that appreciates diversity and a global perspective. At the CISaustralia July in Boston program, you will be studying on the BU campus with more than 7,000 students. For diversity, there are also international students from over 50 countries enrolled in the US ‘summer’ session. During the regular school year the University hosts over 33,000 students!

Enjoy summer in Boston – experience a Red Sox game at Fenway Park or visit Quincy Market. Go shopping on the world renowned Newbury Street, and visit some of the best city cafes in Back Bay. The city hosts multiple theatres, concert venues, sports arenas, parks, and museums. Many activities in the city portray its historical roots and showcase its modern future – there is always something going on!

Highlights

Some highlights of this program include:

  • A beautiful University in a vibrant, historic, cultural city hosting over 250,000 students every year!
  • Six weeks living and experiencing all Boston has to offer – weekend trips to one of the 100+ museums and cultural sites, grabbing fish and chips in Back Bay, Six Flags Amusement park, walking down Newbury street, visiting Sam Adam’s brewery, people watching at Quincy Market and catching a Red Sox baseball game
  • Gaining credit for two academic courses within the 13 different BU faculties (colleges)
  • Be guided by world-class lecturers and professors – BU boasts a research focus and innovative mindset that is envied and imitated by many institutions around the globe
  • The choice of hundreds of BU courses – it’s not easy to select just two to study!
  • Meet students from around the world – create a lifelong network of like-minded and motivated friends
  • All the amazing places you can visit are within easy travelling distance from BU
  • Enjoy being a part of arguably one of the most historic cities in the US. Boston is a historical mecca boasting hundreds of historical sites, walks, museums and memorials.
  • While Australia is in the middle of winter, take 6 weeks out in the Massachusetts summer
  • Try out new restaurants, visit the tourist attractions and sit back and take in diversity and Bostonian pride – Boston is the place to be!

Choose Your Course

Boston University (BU) has one of the strongest education brands in the US and globally. BU is highly ranked and sought after by students worldwide and is in an ideal location with extensive academic choices for students to pursue their passions.

Course Load: As an international student you will be required to take two (2) courses minimum (or equivalent minimum of 8 US credits). BU is very clear that students MUST be enrolled in a minimum of 8 US credits (usually 2 x 4 US credit courses) to keep their valid student visa.

  • Depending on your Australian university, “courses” may be referred to as “subjects” or “units”.
  • Each course/subject/unit you undertake on a CISaustralia program is designed to be a full-time, semester course that has been condensed to fit into an intensive, short-term program. As such, for any 1 course you study abroad, you should receive the credit points for 1 full-time course/subject/unit at your Australian university.
  • Many universities work off of a 1-for-1 equivalency (1 course abroad = 1 course in Australia), but ultimately credit approval is the decision of your faculty and Australian university.
  • CISaustralia strongly recommends that you have any overseas courses pre-approved for academic credit before you depart for your program. Some documentation that may be useful are the course outline/syllabus, program overview and the contact hours.
  • It is best to get 4 or 5 courses approved by your Australian university before you depart for your overseas program. This way you will have plenty of classes to choose from and some flexibility in setting up your schedule.
  • Your CISaustralia Program Advisor can assist with any questions or details your university needs to make a decision.

On the first day of class, your instructor will let you know what textbooks you need to buy. Most assigned textbooks will be available for purchase at the BU Bookstore.

The course system will be available upon application.

How to Choose Your Courses: Now this is the fun part. As part of your application you will complete a CISaustralia Course Selection Worksheet. The instructions provided will assist you through the steps involved in selecting your courses.

Disciplines included in the BU ‘Summer’ (July) sessions include:

  • Communications
  • Marketing
  • Business and Management
  • Cultural Studies
  • Computer Science
  • Film and Television
  • General Education (GE)
  • Language and Literature
  • Mathematics
  • Medicine
  • Natural and Physical Sciences
  • Performing Arts
  • Social Sciences
  • Sustainability
  • Visual Arts
  • …and much more!

Boston University also offers a number of upper-level and graduate courses. These higher level courses will incur additional tuition fees. For further information, please contact CISaustralia.

Academic Requirement: To qualify for this program, students must be in good academic standing with a GPA of 4.5 (out of 7) or equivalent. If your current GPA falls below the requirement, you may still be considered for the program but will need to be prepared to provide supporting documentation. Please contact us to discuss your situation and we will work with you to help find another suitable program if required.

Key to Course Levels:

  • 000-099 – Non-degree credit
  • 100-199 – Introductory or general undergraduate
  • 200-299 – Intermediate undergraduate
  • 300-499 – Advanced undergraduate
  • 500-599 – Advanced undergraduate, graduate
  • 600-799 – General graduate
  • 800-899 – Advanced graduate
  • 900-999 – Advanced graduate, directed study and research

2019 Course Descriptions:

COURSE: COM FT 590
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (COM FT 201).

From TV shows to feature films and webisodes, 2D animation is more popular than ever, but how is it created? This fun yet intensive beginner course teaches all the fundamental skills needed to create great 2D character animation – the way it’s done in the industry. Through progressive hands-on lessons you will learn basic drawing and how to use Adobe Animate CC to make characters walk, talk and come to life. We cover animation storytelling, character design, acting, timing, and facial expressions; how to animate “keys and in-betweens,” compose scenes, use color, and more. Animation history and industry trends are also discussed. Students complete numerous projects including a fully produced animated short film. Many of the skills covered in this class can also be used by filmmakers, 3D animators, broadcast designers, and artists.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CFA AR 431
CREDITS: 2 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: previous drawing experience.

Emphasizes figure drawing; further develops drawing skills. Using various media, students work from the nude model, draped figure, and objects to develop a personal expression.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: COM JO 305
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Students learn the fundamentals of digital photography, from the basics of image capture to processing finished photographs and introduction to their use in digital media. No previous experience in photography is required.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CFA MP 130
CREDITS: 1 US credit
OFFERED: Session 2

Intended for all students. Provides an introduction to fundamentals of singing. No previous experience is necessary to enroll.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS AH 393
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Explores the terms of debate, key figures, and primary sites for the production and reception of contemporary art on a global scale since 1980. Painting, installation art, new media, performance, art criticism, and curatorial practice are discussed.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Historical Consciousness.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: COM CM 323
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Provides knowledge and practice for effective graphic design for all media. Develops a foundation in design principles and creative software skills including Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop, and InDesign. Students create projects demonstrating how design strategies are used to engage audiences, and enhance comprehension of all forms of mass communication from traditional print to digital media.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Digital/Multimedia Expression, Creativity/Innovation.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CFA AR 515
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CFA AR 415) or equivalent.

Acquaints students with the basics of RAW image capture using a digital camera, non-destructive image file management, input and output resolution management, establishment of a digital workflow, adjustment and editing in Adobe Photoshop, fundamentals of color correcting management, digital retouching, and high-end archival inkjet printing. Access to a digital SLR camera is necessary. Material costs are extra.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CFA AR 235
CREDITS: 2 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CFA AR 133) or equivalent.

Drawing from portrait head and figure; emphasis on structure of the human form and the space in which it exists. Experimentation in various media. (Accommodations will be made for students with varying degrees of experience.)

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CFA AR 136
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

An introduction to the practice of representational drawing with the human figure. Focuses on establishing basic skills concerning the translation of three dimensional form onto the two dimensional page. Students investigate methods of identification, definition, and location of form in a comprehensive space utilizing a variety of materials and approaches. Students work from still life, the figure, interior and exterior spaces, and themselves.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: MET MG 448
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

First course in a two course sequence. Combines (1) the practical aspect of web design through the use of application software such as Dreamweaver to construct a commercial website with (2) a general overview of the marketing, supporting services, systems, security, and business strategy issues facing commercial enterprises.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CFA MT 105
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

A creative introduction to the foundational principles of musical structure. Using a multi-modal approach, combining in-class performance exercises, listening, composition, keyboard, aural (and oral) learning, students acquire an analytical vocabulary and the basic knowledge to support the exploration of musical repertoires, to enhance their own performances, and to develop their own musical compositions. Analytical and music-composition projects engage concepts of musical space, time, pitch, rhythm, and harmony as employed in tonal music.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Creativity/Innovation.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CFA ME 550
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

This course, which includes an online component, focuses on progressive and imaginative modes of music education. It draws on the best practices of music and other artistic disciplines to inspire singers, teachers, and arts practitioners of all ages and abilities to discover the power of their own voices and the importance of including others in collaborative music-making.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS EN 552
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

The heritage of Marlowe and Shakespeare: the collapse of a historic world; Jacobean pessimism and decadence in the plays of Webster, Middleton, Ford, and others.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS WR 120
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

This course examines jazz music, with a focus on Boston as a leading center for jazz in the US. Topics include the evolution and history of jazz; its spread to different regions of the country; its major genres or movements; great jazz musicians, bandleaders, and critics; connections between jazz and other musical genres; and the development of jazz in Boston, with special attention to Boston’s musicians, musical styles, schools, and clubs, both past and present. Course materials are drawn from a variety of genres and modes, including concerts, concert reviews, video and audio recordings, historical accounts, and scholarly articles.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CFA AR 141
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

A studio course that emphasizes two-dimensional composition and direct painting in oil. Exercises in representing still life, interior, and portrait introduce basic principles of drawing, composition, and color interaction. Exercises in color mixing, preparing supports, and caring for tools and equipment introduce technical and craft considerations. Individual and group critiques, presentations, and occasional assigned readings complement regular studio class meetings.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CFA AR 389
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Covers the basic principles of design, composition, and form making. These topics are investigated holistically, beginning with their historical origination, contemporary application, and finally in the context of individual practice. Projects and class meetings are structured to help develop a design process and critique skills. The goal is to provide a rigorous understanding of the foundational principles and skills that serve as a strong base for all future design course work and practice. Working knowledge of the Adobe Creative Suite is helpful; software will not be taught. Laptop required. Materials and printing costs are extra.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CFA MU 184
CREDITS: 1 US credit
OFFERED: Session 1

An introduction to the fundamentals of guitar playing. Intended for all students, no previous experience is necessary. By learning music from the Beatles to Bach to the Blues, we cover basic chords, scales, music notation, and both pick- and finger-style playing. Web- and text-based resources are recommended so that students can continue to teach themselves to play after the course ends. Students should bring their own guitars. Several are available for rent from the Music office.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CFA AR 580
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

A chronological survey of theory and practice of graphic design from the Industrial Revolution to the present. Through slide lecture, reading assignments, discussion and a studio project, we actively investigate how graphic design responded to and influenced the social, political, and technological world around it. Emphasis is on European and American design histories, in addition to major movements in Russia and the East. Comparative and symbiotic relationships between graphic design and other visual arts and design disciplines such as architecture and industrial design are analyzed. Questions and comments during the discussion are both welcome and expected.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CFA MH 432
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

A chronological study of the history of — and topics in — jazz, from its beginnings to the present, focusing on styles, major performers and recordings, individuality and sound, instruments, voices, and forms, as well as social and cultural issues, such as race, popularity and commercialism, the individual versus and within the group, American identity and global rejection/admiration.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Social Inquiry I, Critical Thinking.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS HI 280
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Special Topics in American History. Examines the role of popular music in American culture. Studies the origin and growth of the music industry, and attempts to integrate it into the general social and intellectual history of the country. The emphasis is on rock ‘n’ roll and its impact on America from 1954-1970.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS AH 389
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Impressionism, its sources, and its aftermath, from the painting of modern life and leisure by Manet, Monet, Morisot, Renoir, and Degas, to the evocation of spirituality, pain, and desire in the work of Van Gogh, Gauguin, Rodin, and Munch.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Historical Consciousness.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS EN 143
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Introduction to the understanding, interpretation, and appreciation of a wide range of drama from different eras and diverse places, from the festivals of ancient Greece to the twenty-first century Broadway stage. We consider extraordinary plays from Renaissance England, nineteenth- century Europe, and twentieth-century Africa and the United States. Likely works include Antigone, Macbeth, A Doll’s House, Death and The King’s Horseman, Angels in America, Top Dog / Underdog and Hamilton. Focus on theater as a distinctive, developing artistic form, with explorations of political and aesthetic contexts. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same number that was previously titled “Literary Types: Drama.”

Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CFA AR 133
CREDITS: 2 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

For students with little or no experience in drawing. Introduction to basic problems of expressing volume, space, and light; emphasis on use of line, proportion, and tone. More experienced students may draw from portrait head and figure.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CFA AR 143
CREDITS: 2 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

For students with little or no experience in painting. Work in oil technique to study problems of design, form in space, and color.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CFA AR 251
CREDITS: 2 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Survey of basic printmaking techniques with emphasis on relief processes and basic intaglio processes. Concepts of design, image development, color layering and experimentation, and markmaking are emphasized. Studio projects and lectures.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS AH 220
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Examines key monuments of Islamic art and architecture within their historical and cultural context, and emphasizes the diversity within the visual cultures of the Islamic world.

Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy, Research and Information Literacy.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CFA AR 415
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Designed to assist the student in mastering the techniques of black and white photography, including negative exposure, film development, and print production. Critical evaluation of photographs, relationship of photography to other visual media, and study of both historical and contemporary precedents. No previous experience is required, but access to a 35mm camera with manual exposure capability is necessary. Material costs are extra.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CFA ME 538
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Students participate in small rock ensembles and examine the pedagogy of that type of ensemble. Lectures and demonstrations include topics such as equipment selection, repertoire selection, and performance techniques. An additional emphasis is on techniques for amplifying rock ensembles. Students also learn fundamental techniques for recording rock ensembles

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CFA MU 535
CREDITS: 1 - 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Special Topics in Music. Strategies for string performers and educators to thrive in the 21st century. Topics include: motivating and engaging music learners; health/wellness; entrepreneurship; and collaborative performance of eclectic string styles. Activities are suitable for students with beginning to advanced string playing experience.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CFA MH 410
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Students engage with hip-hop history, including aesthetic trends, some important artists and works, regional styles, and relationship with the larger sociocultural context. Students will critique and remake hip hop canons. The course investigates how hip hop is shaped by race, class, and gender issues. Students will acquire and apply listening, viewing, and reading skills to interpret primary and secondary sources and bring their analyses of these sources to bear.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Historical Consciousness.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CFA AR 385
CREDITS: 2 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Focuses on concepts and applications of modern typography through introduction to the typographic organization of information and the basic structures of visual messages. Study of letter forms, type styles, typographic nomenclature, measurement, and spacing. Laptop required.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS AH 201
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Introduces a range of approaches to understanding architecture in an historical perspective. Learn how architects and others have interpreted meaning through rubrics of art, nature, and culture, focused upon European and American architecture from 1400 to the present.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Historical Consciousness, Research and Information Literacy.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: COM JO 205
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Provides students with a basic working knowledge of the media required for professional journalism, including photography, sound, video, and editing for production of multimedia packages. No previous experience in visual media is required. Students contribute to the department-managed news service.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CFA MH 563
CREDITS: 1 - 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Special Topics in Musicology. This hands-on course explores the magical shadow play music of Bali, Indonesia, through in-depth reading, discussion, and performance. In addition to learning about the close connection between music and culture in Bali, each class provides musical instruction on Balinese instruments. Students learn both parts to a complex, intricate musical composition and learn to perform compositions together.

We are fortunate to have two quartets of gender wayang (xylophone-style) instruments purchased by Boston University, as well as the antique set of Professor Heimarck, providing a total of twelve Balinese instruments. The class is open to all students and does not require previous musical training.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS WR 151
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Writing, Research, & Inquiry with Oral and/or Signed Expression. In this course, students look at and listen to a number of albums by critically acclaimed singer-songwriters, with an emphasis on the song lyrics and the ways in which individual songs work together to produce a cohesive album. We analyze albums by contemporary songwriters chosen by the class and make use of up-to-date resources like the Tiny Desk Concert series from NPR’s All Songs Considered. Additionally, the course compares and contrasts recent releases with some classic albums from the past, including Bob Dylan’s Blood on the Tracks and Joni Mitchell’s Blue.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS MA 119
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Applications of mathematics for personal financial decision-making. Systems of equations, exponential functions, logarithms, probability, descriptive statistics, and numerical simulation, for modeling saving, borrowing, inflation, purchasing power, taxation, government benefits, risk management, insurance, annuities, and investments.

Carries MCS divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry I, Quantitative Reasoning I. This course also fulfills the learning outcomes for Life Skills.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: QST AC 565
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq or Coreq: (QST AC 348).

Introduces the basic concepts underlying auditing and assurance services (including materiality, audit risk, and evidence) and demonstrates how to apply these concepts to audit and assurance services through financial statement audits.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS EC 323
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS EC 201).

Introduction to a new field in economics that challenges the traditional model of rational decision-making and uses research in psychology to construct alternative models. Covers the theory of choice under certainty, uncertainty, and temptation; biases in judgment; social preferences.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: MET AD 571
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (MET AD 100 Pre-Analytics Laboratory).

Presents fundamental knowledge and skills for applying business analytics to managerial decision making in corporate environments. Topics include descriptive analytics (techniques for categorizing, characterizing, consolidation, and classifying data for conversion into useful information for the purposes of understanding and analyzing business performance); predictive analytics (techniques for detection of hidden patterns in large quantities of data to segment and group data into coherent sets in order to predict behavior and trends); and prescriptive analytics (techniques for identification of best alternatives for maximizing or minimizing business objectives). Students learn how to use data effectively to drive rapid, precise, and profitable analytics-based decisions. The framework of using interlinked data-inputs, analytics models, and decision-support tools are applied within a proprietary business analytics shell and demonstrated with examples from different functional areas of the enterprise.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: MET MG 310
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Organization and techniques for effective verbal and written communication in the business environment. Emphasis on developing communication skills through practical written and oral assignments.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: MET AD 501
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Techniques for effective written and verbal communications. This course is a special offering for students for whom English is a second language.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: MET MG 530
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Policy problems of business organizations. Integrates the areas of marketing, finance, accounting, economics, and personnel into a managerial concept of business decision making.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: QST SM 131
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: Open to Questrom students and required of all Questrom 1st-semester freshmen. Open to non-Questrom students who have completed at least onesemester of full-time coursework on the CRC. Required of all Questrom first-year students.

Explores the ethical problems facing global management. Through identification and discussion of the substantive disciplines relevant to business, students uncover a complicated analysis necessary to make appropriate decisions and highlight their interdependencies. Stresses written and oral communication skills and logical reasoning as an ingredient for sound analysis and rational business planning.

This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Ethical Reasoning.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: QST MK 469
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (QST MK 323).

Marketing communication strategy has moved beyond advertising to include interactive marketing, sales promotions, direct marketing, public relations, and more. This course focuses on developing a marketing communication strategy that integrates these tools for more efficient and effective communication. Topics include the establishment of objectives based on a situation analysis, developing subsequent messages, creative and media strategies, effectiveness testing, and client/agency relationships.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: QST FE 459
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (QST FE 323) and (CAS CS 108 or CAS CS 111) and (QST FE 445, recommended).

Teaches students how to use computational techniques to implement financial algorithms for security pricing and risk analysis, including bonds, stocks, and options. This will be a rigorous, hands-on programming course to prepare students for quantitative jobs in finance. The overall objective of the course is to enhance the students’ understanding of the well-known financial models used to price securities including bonds and options and to evaluate the risk and return characteristics of stocks and portfolios. After the course, students will have a deeper understanding of investment portfolios, risk management techniques that use derivatives, and arbitrage strategies. Additionally, students will become comfortable with a modern programming language based on functional and object-oriented programming which will enhance their job opportunities in a variety of fields beyond finance.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: QST FE 449
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (QST FE 323). Required for Finance concentrators.

Covers the financial manager’s role in obtaining and allocating funds. Includes topics such as cash budgeting, working capital analysis, dividend policy, capital investment analysis, and debt policy as well as their associated risks. Valuation of companies, mergers and acquisitions, and bankruptcy are covered. The course requires using financial models and spreadsheets. Applications are made to current events and everyday business finance problems.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: MET CJ 510
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Special Topics in Criminal Justice. Contemporary law enforcement agencies regularly employ crime and intelligence analysis to develop and inform effective responses to crime. This course provides an in-depth examination of crime and intelligence analysis techniques. Also explores the role of the crime and intelligence analyst within law enforcement organizations and processes, the historical evolution of this approach, key legal and policy issues, and challenges to implementation. Students have the opportunity to apply these skills to case study simulations involving an array of common crime problems and cases using real-world examples and sources of information.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS EC 337
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS EC 201).

Economic analysis of current important legal issues. Contributions of economics to analysis of contracts, torts property, and crime. Effects of property rights on allocation of resources and distribution of income. Market and nonmarket schemes of regulating the environment.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS EC 404
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

(CAS EC 201 and one of CAS MA 121, 122, 123, 124, 127 or 129), or consent of instructor. Recommended: CAS EC 403.

Introduction to the field of information economics and its applications. Covers a wide range of situations in which players have access to different private information and this private information differently affects their incentives and strategic behavior.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS EC 320
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS EC 101 & CAS EC 102).

Theoretical and empirical examination of the structural changes associated with the process of economic development; special reference to poor regions and countries; rigorous analysis of criteria for policy judgments in development planning and programming.

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COURSE: CAS EC 385
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS EC 201) and (CAS EC 203 or CAS EC 305); or the equivalent.

Applies the tools of microeconomic theory and empirical methods to study questions such as the optimal design of sports leagues, the impact of new stadiums on a local economy, fan (customer) discrimination, and salary differentials between players.

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COURSE: CAS EC 356
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS EC 201).

Application of current theories of labor supply and demand, wages, education and experience, immigration, labor efficiency, discrimination, and unemployment. Appraisal of the effects of government policies on labor markets.

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COURSE: MET MG 448
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

First course in a two course sequence. Combines (1) the practical aspect of web design through the use of application software such as Dreamweaver to construct a commercial website with (2) a general overview of the marketing, supporting services, systems, security, and business strategy issues facing commercial enterprises.

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COURSE: CAS EC 203
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS EC 101 & CAS EC 102).

First semester of a two-semester sequence of empirical techniques used in economic analysis. Statistical concepts are presented and applied to a variety of economics problems. Extensive use of the statistical software package STATA will be made.

This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Quantitative Reasoning I.

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COURSE: CAS EC 204
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq:(CAS EC 101 & CAS EC 102) and (CAS EC 203 or equivalent).

Builds on the material in EC203, developing more complex statistical techniques and applications. This course covers similar material to that in CAS EC 304 but in a more applied fashion (students who desire a more mathematically intense introduction to econometrics should consider taking EC 304 rather than EC 204).

Note that students may not receive credit for both EC 204 and EC 304. Either EC 204 or EC 304 may be counted as one of the three required electives in the economics minor.

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COURSE: MET MG 410
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Covers the four key elements of successful entrepreneurial management: choosing a business, organizing, financing, and marketing. Includes preparing a business plan, becoming an entrepreneur, raising venture capital, selling, negotiating, and building an effective organization. Topics given special consideration are the practice of innovation, the art of leadership, and how to relate talents to succeeding in innovative venture and technology management.

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COURSE: QST ES 215
CREDITS: 2 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: sophomore standing. For Questrom students only, and CGS students intending to continue to Questrom. Combines the content of ES 110 and ES 210.

The course is designed to equip students with the knowledge, tools, and skills needed to explore career opportunities and build their career management capabilities. This course focuses on career exploration within the broader context and scope of business careers. Students explore personal values, interests, and skills as the foundation for career management. They learn skills for exploring traditional and emerging industries, organizations, and occupations that align with their business and career aspirations. Students learn and apply basic career search tools and techniques, craft a strong resume and cover letter, develop a search strategy, practice interviewing and informational conversations, and begin to network with Questrom students and alumni.

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COURSE: QST SM 104
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Read, understand, and analyze financial statements such as income statements and balance sheets. Covers techniques of internal financial analysis such as breakeven, budgeting, financial forecasting, and tools to aid in decision making. Introduction to the time value of money and capital budgeting using discounted cash flow analysis. Intended for non-business majors.

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COURSE: SHA HF 410
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (SHA HF 210) and (SHA HF 310) and (CAS MA 113 or CAS MA 115).

Studies the techniques financial managers and external analysts employ to value the firm and its assets. Topics include financial statement analysis, taxation, discounted cash flow, stock and bond valuation, cost of capital, and capital budgeting. The techniques of discounted cash flow and the command of taxation principles developed in the course are applied to commercial real estate analysis, including hospitality properties.

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COURSE: QST AC 221
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: (QST SM 131) and (CAS MA 120 or CAS MA 121 or CAS MA 123, previous or concurrent).

Basic concepts underlying financial statements and accounting procedures used in preparing statements of financial position, income statements, and statements of cash flow. Stresses the interpretation, analysis, and evaluation of published financial statements.

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COURSE: MET MG 472
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Emphasizes issues of accounting, finance, and economics that are important in most management contexts. Introduction to tools of financial analysis and the problems of financial management including cash, profitability, and capital budgeting. Various sources of corporate funds are considered, including short-, intermediate-, and long-term arrangements. Stresses understanding financial statements, planning and control, cost and benefit evaluation, cash flow analysis, and capital budgeting.

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COURSE: COM CM 417
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (COM CM 217 or COM CM 317) and (COM CM 331).

Focus is on the strategic creative process in advertising including concept development, copywriting, visualization, and design. Assignments require conceiving solutions to client marketing challenges across a range of media. Teaches foundations for development of effective advertising: problem definition, strategic development, and conceptual idea generation through tangible executions.

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COURSE: CAS EC 403
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS MA 121 or CAS MA 123 or CAS MA 127).

Models of decision-making in which the choices of different individuals interact: basic equilibrium notions in normal form games, including signaling games and repeated games. Applications include auctions, foreign policy, takeover bids, entry deterrence, cooperation and conflict, financial markets, and public goods.

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COURSE: CAS WS 302 / CAS SO 390
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Topics in Sociology. Examines social forces shaping gender discrepancies in crime. Using a feminist lens, students explore how cultural ideologies about masculinity and femininity shape criminalization, victimization, and offending. Topics include the gendered contexts of crime and punishment, gender-based violence, and intimate labor.

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COURSE: SHA HF 432
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: SHA HF 231, Seniors only.

Focus on leadership and management for the hospitality industry. Using a leadership continuum as a framework, the course explores several different levels of leadership, from a “traditional” leadership role as the head of a major corporation, to the more personal aspect of self-leadership. Several different leadership models are analyzed and applied to the hospitality industry. Leadership tools are explored: hands-on, realistic tools that students can use in personal life, while in school, and in the business world.

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COURSE: SHA HF 231
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (SHA HF 100).

Explores contemporary human resources management relative to the hospitality industry, with emphasis on planning, job analysis, recruitment, selection, hiring, placement, and ethnic diversity in the workplace. Specifically, the course concentrates on employee motivation, leadership, training, team building, employee performance, and retention. Management philosophies of work compensation, discipline, and labor relations are discussed as they affect current hospitality industry strategies to attract and retain a quality workforce.

This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy.

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COURSE: QST AC 347
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (QST AC 221) and (QST AC 222, previous or concurrent).

Provides foundation for solving financial reporting issues through the study of the conceptual framework of accounting, recognition and measurement of current and non-current assets, revenue recognition, and the development of the income statement and balance sheet.

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COURSE: CAS EC 202
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: (CAS EC 102).

Determination of aggregate income and employment. Analysis of fiscal and monetary policy. Inflation and incomes policy. Problems of the open economy.

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COURSE: CAS EC 201
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: (CAS EC 101). Determination of commodity prices and factor prices under differing market conditions of competition and monopoly.

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COURSE: MET MG 520
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Environmental, economic, political, and social constraints on doing business abroad. Examines the effects of overseas business investments on domestic and foreign economics; foreign market analysis and operational strategy of a firm; and development potential of international operations.

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COURSE: CAS EC 391
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS EC 201).

The pure theory of international trade. Topics include comparative advantage and gains from trade, tariff and nontariff barriers to trade, and case studies in international economic policy.

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COURSE: MET MG 431
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Organization of the marketing function in international business. How government policies and practices affect marketing. Comparative marketing strategies for doing business abroad. Examination of case studies.

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COURSE: CAS PO 329 / CAS IR 390
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Emphasizes the dynamic interaction between politics and economics to understand and explain historical and contemporary issues in international political economy, including international monetary, trade, investment, financial, and environmental relations. Considers emerging challenges and structures in the international political economy.

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COURSE: COM CM 217
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Explores the history, nature, function, practice, and social and economic aspects of advertising; ethical responsibilities, psychological appeals, marketing, media, research, product analysis, creative strategies, and agency operation. Students prepare a comprehensive advertising plan including a marketing strategy and speculative advertising campaign.

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COURSE: QST FE 101
CREDITS: 2 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq for Questrom students: (QST SM 131). Coreq for non-Questrom students: (QST SM 131, strongly recommended). Required of all Questrom first-year students.

Offers a rigorous overview of principles of finance, such as time value of money, interest rates, basic valuation of cash flow streams, and basic stock and bond valuation. Uses a combination of teaching materials including online problem solving and case writing that help the student through the intensive syllabus.

FE 101 and FE 323 offer a comprehensive overview of finance to Questrom School of Business students.

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COURSE: CAS EC 387
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS EC 201).

Concepts of health economics applicable to both developed and developing countries. Topics include effect of health on the economy, effect of health care on health, hospital behavior, health work-force supply, and demand for health care.

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COURSE: QST LA 245
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: (QST SM 131) or sophomore standing.

Provides a broad overview of the American judicial system and fundamental legal issues. Examines dispute resolution, torts, contracts, criminal law, business organizations, employment law, intellectual property, and international law. The goal is to understand not only the basic rules of law but also the underlying social policies and ethical dilemmas.

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COURSE: QST SM 101
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

A broad introduction to the nature and activities of business enterprises within the United States’ economic and political framework. Course content introduces economic systems, essential elements of business organization, production, human resource management, marketing, finance, and risk management. Key objectives of the course are development of business vocabulary and a fundamental understanding of how businesses make money. This course is intended for non-business majors.

It may not be taken by Questrom students for credit nor can it be used by Boston University students toward the Business Administration minor.

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COURSE: SHA HF 100
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

This introductory course is open to all BU students and is the prerequisite for School of Hospitality courses. Students gain an historical perspective and identify current events and trends in lodging, restaurants, and event management. The course provides an overview of the global hospitality/tourism industry, including the critical elements of managing services. The Boston market, multimedia assignments, and team-based projects are integrated into the learning environment.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, Digital/Multimedia Expression, Teamwork/Collaboration.

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COURSE: CAS EC 102
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

The second semester of a standard two-semester sequence for those considering further work in management or economics. National economic performance; the problems of recession, unemployment, and inflation; money creation; government spending and taxation; economic policies for full employment and price stability; and international trade and payments.

Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Social Inquiry I, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy.

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COURSE: CAS EC 101
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

The first semester of a standard two-semester sequence for those considering further work in management or economics. Coverage includes economics of households, business firms, and markets; consumer behavior and the demand for commodities; production, costs, and the supply of commodities; price determination; competition and monopoly; efficiency of resource allocation; governmental regulation; income distribution; and poverty. Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area(s): Social Inquiry I, Ethical Reasoning, Critical Thinking.

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COURSE: QST FE 445
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (QST FE 323). Required for Finance concentrators.

Introduction to the investment management process. Defining investment objectives and constraints. Introduction to Modern Portfolio Theory, CAPM, APT, Efficient Markets, and stock and bond valuation models. Immunizing interest-rate risk. Active vs. passive investment strategies, fundamental vs. technical analysis, trading practices, and performance evaluation. Introduction to the role of futures and options in hedging and speculation. Students are expected to become familiar with current events in the financial news.

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COURSE: QST FE 454
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (QST FE 323).

Provides an overview of the economic functions provided by investment banks including a history of the industry, current events, and the difference between large, full service investment banks and smaller, boutique firms. Heavy emphasis on pro forma analysis and Initial Public Offering and M&A valuation techniques. Topics include: What do investment bankers do? What are the different types of analyses performed by investment bankers? What are the various types of financial securities? What is the underwriting process and how are securities priced? How are companies valued? How are potential synergies valued? The course focuses on the issuing process and pricing for equity, fixed income, and equity-linked securities. The course also focuses on the role of investment banks in mergers, acquisitions, divestitures, and other restructurings. Additional topics include equity research, capital markets industry regulations, as well as typical career paths and opportunities.

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COURSE: COM JO 350
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

This interactive course introduces the core legal and ethical issues affecting how journalists, including the student press, gather, verify, and communicate news. This course offers an exciting deep-dive into the key concepts affecting newsgathering and dissemination today. Students discover the underpinnings of a free press as well as practical tools to use when confronted with government efforts to block legitimate newsgathering. Students gain a working knowledge of how and why the First Amendment protects them as they gather, verify, and disseminate the news. Required of all undergraduate journalism majors.

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COURSE: CAS PO 320
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Special Topics in American Politics. Investigates the judiciary’s role in the policy making process. Compares the courts with other political institutions and explores how they differ in their policy-making role. The objective is to develop an understanding of the courts as political actors.

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COURSE: QST ES 275
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS WR 100, QST FE 101, & QST SM 131). Sophomore standing. Questrom students only.

Persuasive written and oral communications are essential skills that are required for success in every business discipline. In this course, students learn how to communicate clearly and persuasively. Course objectives include learning how to inspire action through compelling, high-impact communications by taking a point of view and supporting it with logic and evidence, generating insights with meaningful conclusions and recommendations, and understanding and applying the principles of logical reasoning to organize information and lead an audience to action.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Writing, Research, and Inquiry, Oral and/or Signed Communication, Research and Information Literacy.

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COURSE: QST AC 222
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: (QST AC 221) and (QST QM 221, previous or concurrent, highly recommended). Sophomore requirement.

Introduces the basic principles, methods, and challenges of modern managerial accounting. Covers traditional topics such as job-order costing, cost-volume-profit analysis, budgeting and variance analysis, profitability analysis, relevant costs for decision making, and cost-plus pricing, as well as emerging topics such as Activity-Based Cost (ABC) accounting. The material is examined from the perspective of students preparing to use management accounting information as managers, to support decision making (such as pricing, product mix, sourcing, and technology decisions) and short- and long-term planning, and to measure, evaluate, and reward performance. Emphasizes the relationships between accounting techniques and other organizational activities (such as strategy and motivation).

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COURSE: COM CM 522
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (COM CM 215 or COM CM 301). Grad Prereq: (COM CM 701).

Review and diagnosis of major crises and issues affecting corporations. Case discussions of five types of crises: technological, confrontational, malevolence, management failure, and management control. Examines appropriate management actions and communications before, during, and after a crisis. Reviews issues management: monitoring, analysis, strategy determination, and implementation.

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COURSE: CAS EC 332
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS EC 201).

Structure of the American economy. The theory of imperfect competition. Topics include firm concentration and conglomeration, consumer ignorance and market failure, and advertising and technological change as part of market performance.

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COURSE: MET CJ 510
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Special Topics in Criminal Justice. Starting in the 1980s, America experienced an unprecedented increase in the use of incarceration as a form of punishment. Although criminal justice reform movements and policy changes have recently slowed the growth in America’s prison population, America’s incarceration rate remains among the highest in the world. This course investigates the social, political, and historical roots of the mass incarceration “experiment,” and examines the consequences it has had and continues to have on individuals, families, communities, governments, and society. The course also focuses on the implications that mass incarceration has on the operation, management, and leadership of correctional agencies. Students will assess and debate public policy options for further reform. Class discussions include specialized experts from a variety of perspectives and evaluation of prominent readings that have taken stock of America’s experience with mass incarceration over the past several decades.

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COURSE: QST QM 222
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (QST QM 221 & CAS EC 101). Sophomore standing.

Examines the use of economic and statistical tools for making business decisions. Topics include optimization (including linear programming), multiple regression, demand modeling, cost modeling, industry analysis (including models of perfect competition, monopoly, and oligopoly), and game theory. Emphasizes modeling with spreadsheets.

This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Quantitative Reasoning II.

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COURSE: CAS EC 341
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS EC 202).

Survey of commercial and central banking institutions. Examination of macro relations between financial organizations and principal objectives of stabilization policy.

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COURSE: QST FE 442
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (QST FE 323). Required for Finance concentrators.

The financial system and its functions. The role of money and the importance of interest rates in determining economic activity; determinants of level of interest rates. Operation of central banks; the goals and instruments of monetary policy. The roles, activities, and risk management of financial institutions. Instruments traded in money and capital markets, and their valuation. Role of derivative securities; systemic risk and other contemporary issues in the financial system.

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COURSE: MET MG 515
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

A communications skills course that explores the nature of conflict and its resolution through persuasion, collaboration, and negotiation. Students learn theories of interpersonal and organizational conflict and its resolution as applied to personal, corporate, historical, and political contexts. Students assess their own styles, skills, and values, and develop techniques to better resolve disputes, achieve objectives, and exert influence.

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COURSE: MET MG 202
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

The development of personal investment strategies using money and credit. Securities and portfolio management, budgeting, insurance, taxes, retirement programs, and estate planning.

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COURSE: CAS IR 527 / CAS PO 548
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: junior standing or consent of instructor.

How did China implement economic reform? What were the progresses and limitations? How is China’s political-economic development influencing the global system? Discussions are conducted in a comparative perspective. Countries of reference include Japan and India.

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COURSE: QST QM 221
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Exposes students to the fundamentals of probability, decision analysis, and statistics, and their application to business. Topics include probability, decision analysis, distributions, sampling, estimation, hypothesis testing, and chi-square.

This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Quantitative Reasoning I.

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COURSE: MET MG 415
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Examination of project management concepts, including organizational forms, planning and control techniques, and the role of the project manager. Develops the skills vital to effective management of multidisciplinary tasks through lectures, case studies, and business simulations.

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COURSE: COM CM 502 / COM FT 521
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Teaches students how to market their creative works online. Students learn to identify targeted marketing and distribution platforms for new websites, video channels, series, and blogs, and how to use social media to find an audience, generate buzz, and identify potential funding sources. Students also learn practical entrepreneurial tools needed to organize their creative work as a business venture.

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COURSE: QST FE 469
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (QST FE 323).

Provides an introduction to and an understanding of real estate finance. Draws together and considers major functional areas including: structuring, ownership, finance, taxation, property valuation, and analysis. The course provides a framework for decision making in the real estate investment and finance fields. The course is specifically designed to offer students interested in real estate careers a foundation upon which to build.

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COURSE: QST SI 422
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (QST FE 323, QST MK 323, QST OM 323, & QST QM 323).

Provides students with a powerful set of tools which prepares them to analyze, formulate, and implement business firm strategy with the aim of attaining sustainable competitive advantage. Adopts the perspective of the general manager, challenging student knowledge in each functional area in the effort to create integrative strategies that serve the needs of shareholders, as well as other stakeholders inside and outside the company. The course includes conceptual readings, which elucidate the fundamental concepts and frameworks of strategic management, as well as case analyses, which enable students to apply their knowledge to real-world situations and managerial decisions.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy, Writing-intensive Course, Creativity/Innovation.

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COURSE: QST OB 221
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (QST FE 101). Sophomore standing.

An experiential learning-based course that studies what people think, feel, and do in organizational settings, focusing on individual, interpersonal, group, and organizational processes. The primary objective is to help students understand and manage organizational dynamics as effectively as possible. This is done through analysis of readings; reflecting on hands-on, real-time experiences in organizations and in teamwork; practice opportunities in class sessions, creative applications, and team exercises; and papers written by students and teams.

This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Teamwork/Collaboration.

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COURSE: COM FT 590
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (COM FT 201).

From TV shows to feature films and webisodes, 2D animation is more popular than ever, but how is it created? This fun yet intensive beginner course teaches all the fundamental skills needed to create great 2D character animation – the way it’s done in the industry. Through progressive hands-on lessons you will learn basic drawing and how to use Adobe Animate CC to make characters walk, talk and come to life. We cover animation storytelling, character design, acting, timing, and facial expressions; how to animate “keys and in-betweens,” compose scenes, use color, and more. Animation history and industry trends are also discussed. Students complete numerous projects including a fully produced animated short film. Many of the skills covered in this class can also be used by filmmakers, 3D animators, broadcast designers, and artists.

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COURSE: CAS WR 112
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS WR 097 or CAS WR 111) or placement test results.

Emphasis on critical reading and analytical writing in response to various theme-based texts. Review of grammar and mechanics in context. Intensive practice in the patterns of academic argumentation through multiple writing assignments of increasing complexity. Refinement of speaking skills through discussions and oral presentations.

This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy.

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COURSE: MET MG 310
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Organization and techniques for effective verbal and written communication in the business environment. Emphasis on developing communication skills through practical written and oral assignments.

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COURSE: MET AD 501
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Techniques for effective written and verbal communications. This course is a special offering for students for whom English is a second language.

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COURSE: QST MK 469
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (QST MK 323).

Marketing communication strategy has moved beyond advertising to include interactive marketing, sales promotions, direct marketing, public relations, and more. This course focuses on developing a marketing communication strategy that integrates these tools for more efficient and effective communication. Topics include the establishment of objectives based on a situation analysis, developing subsequent messages, creative and media strategies, effectiveness testing, and client/agency relationships.

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COURSE: COM CM 313
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (COM CM 215 or COM CM 301).

Explores the trends and issues affecting corporations, crisis management, public affairs communication, consumer affairs, employee relations, environmental problems, and issues of multinationals. Uses case studies.

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COURSE: COM CM 443
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (COM CM 215 or COM CM 301).

Explores the effects of new media on the fundamental theories, models, and practices of public relations. Studies how websites, blogs, citizen journalism, social media, direct-to-consumer communication, podcasting, viral marketing, and other technology-enabled changes are affecting interpersonal, small group, and mass media relationships. Also covers and uses the interactive tools that are re- defining the practice of public relations. Combines lecture, discussion, guest speakers, case study, and research to help students uncover and appreciate the power and potential of interactive media.

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COURSE: CAS WR 120
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

This course looks at how our use of language and the form of our language has changed because of technology. From the pen to the phone to the Internet, our use of language is influenced by the changes in technology around us. Through the production of verbal and non-verbal artifacts, students learn how to master a variety of discourse and research methods, how to read various cultural texts, and how to produce their own texts in response. Readings will include Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close by Jonathan Safran Foer and Alone Together – Why we expect more from Technology and Less from Each Other by Sherry Turkle.

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COURSE: COM CO 201
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: (CAS WR 100 or WR 120) or equivalent.

The College of Communication’s core undergraduate writing course. Students refresh their grammatical and stylistic skills and apply those skills to professional writing assignments. Prepares students to write with clarity, conciseness, precision, and accuracy for the communication fields.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Writing-Intensive Course, Oral and/or Signed Communication, Research and Information Literacy.

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COURSE: COM JO 350
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

This interactive course introduces the core legal and ethical issues affecting how journalists, including the student press, gather, verify, and communicate news. This course offers an exciting deep-dive into the key concepts affecting newsgathering and dissemination today. Students discover the underpinnings of a free press as well as practical tools to use when confronted with government efforts to block legitimate newsgathering. Students gain a working knowledge of how and why the First Amendment protects them as they gather, verify, and disseminate the news. Required of all undergraduate journalism majors.

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COURSE: QST ES 275
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS WR 100, QST FE 101, & QST SM 131). Sophomore standing. Questrom students only.

Persuasive written and oral communications are essential skills that are required for success in every business discipline. In this course, students learn how to communicate clearly and persuasively. Course objectives include learning how to inspire action through compelling, high-impact communications by taking a point of view and supporting it with logic and evidence, generating insights with meaningful conclusions and recommendations, and understanding and applying the principles of logical reasoning to organize information and lead an audience to action.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Writing, Research, and Inquiry, Oral and/or Signed Communication, Research and Information Literacy.

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COURSE: COM CM 321
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Introduction to the philosophy and process of social-scientific research and the most common methods used to study mass communication. Includes a variety of research methods, an examination of data-analysis procedures, and an analysis of mass communication issues.

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COURSE: COM CM 441
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (COM CM 215 or COM CM 301) and (COM CM 331).

Students study a variety of publicity tactics (news conferences, feature placements, special events, and media tours), which they combine into publicity campaign plans. Involves lectures, in-class discussions, video cases, and individual take-home cases. Students are encouraged to plan campaigns in their area of interest (e.g., business, arts, sports, and politics).

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COURSE: CAS LJ 283
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

In English translation. Japanese film from the silent era to contemporary animation, with attention to the intersection of cinematic and cultural analysis and genres such as yakuza movies. Directors studied may include Ozu, Kurosawa, Mizoguchi, and Miyazaki Hayao.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy.

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COURSE: MET MG 515
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

A communications skills course that explores the nature of conflict and its resolution through persuasion, collaboration, and negotiation. Students learn theories of interpersonal and organizational conflict and its resolution as applied to personal, corporate, historical, and political contexts. Students assess their own styles, skills, and values, and develop techniques to better resolve disputes, achieve objectives, and exert influence.

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COURSE: COM JO 200
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

The goal of this course is for students to acquire fundamental newsgathering and writing skills needed to thrive as journalists working in any medium. The course is based in the classroom, but students are expected to learn and adhere to professional newsroom standards. The course focuses on essential practices and principles that apply to reporters, photographers, bloggers, producers, and editors across all media formats. The class emphasizes news judgment, storytelling and reporting skills, as well as writing clearly and quickly

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COURSE: COM CM 215
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

An introduction to the field of public relations: its theoretical origins, scope, and principles. Discussion focuses on researching problems, setting objectives, identifying audiences, designing messages, choosing communication channels, and evaluating results for all types of organizations. Ethical decision making, on-line communication, and career opportunities are also analyzed case studies in the field. The format is a combination of informal lecture and small-group discussion, case analysis, and guest lecture.

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COURSE: COM FT 353
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: (COM FT 201) with a grade of B- or higher.

An intensive course in all the fundamental aspects of motion picture production. Students learn to use cameras, sound recording equipment, and editing software and then apply these skills to several short productions. Emphasizes the language of visual storytelling and the creative interplay of sound and image.

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COURSE: COM CM 211
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Students learn the essentials of effective presentation, from preparation, audience analysis, and content development to critical thinking when presenting. Students will incorporate theories and skills of effective communication in a variety of contexts (e.g., common business and social settings).

This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Oral and/or Signed Communication.

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COURSE: COM CM 502 / COM FT 521
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Teaches students how to market their creative works online. Students learn to identify targeted marketing and distribution platforms for new websites, video channels, series, and blogs, and how to use social media to find an audience, generate buzz, and identify potential funding sources. Students also learn practical entrepreneurial tools needed to organize their creative work as a business venture.

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COURSE: COM JO 210
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq:(COM CO 201) and (COM JO 200 or JO 250).

This course helps students advance their reporting skills by covering a city neighborhood or a topical beat. Students branch out across the city and suburbs to cover courts, crime, education, local and state politics, and other essentials of community reporting. Students develop their own sources and story ideas with the goal of professional publication in the department-managed news service or another news site. The purpose is to hone reporting skills, develop sources, and build both competence and confidence. Students produce stories, photos, audio and video for the Web. Class is run like a newsroom, and students are encouraged to show enterprise.

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COURSE: COM FT 201
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

In this course, students study and practice the art and craft of expressing themselves persuasively through audio-visual media. The aim is both to familiarize students with the conventions of screen language and to test the validity of those norms.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Digital/Multimedia Expression, Creativity/Innovation.

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COURSE: CAS LC 287
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Major Chinese films interpreted in light of modern Chinese history and culture. Focuses on questions of national and cultural identity in films from the 1980s to the present day by directors from Mainland China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong. In English.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy.

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COURSE: COM FT 310
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

An introduction to the art and craft of storytelling through the moving image. Particular emphasis is given to writing short scripts. Topics covered include character development and narrative structure as it applies to shorts, features and episodic television.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Writing-intensive Course, Creativity/Innovation.

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COURSE: COM FT 250
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Required of all students in the Film Program. An introduction to the art of film. How do films make meaning? How do audiences understand them? Explores some of the ways in which movies teach us new ways of knowing. Students also study a variety of historical examples of different styles that illustrate the expressive possibilities of image and sound.

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COURSE: COM CM 180
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Traces the development, surveys the literature, and explores the impact of media–whether traditional, interactive, social or mobile–examining conceptual, theoretical, and practical aspects of today’s global media environment. The course also reviews the factors that have shaped the nature of contemporary media, including their content, uses, functions, and audiences. This course provides students with a broad understanding of the social and psychological impact of mediated communication and empowers students to think originally and critically about how media technologies evolve, function, advance, and shape society, industry, and professional practices. It makes dynamic connections between theoretical frameworks, everyday life, and industry practices in a manner that can engage undergraduate students in Advertising, Media Science, and Public Relations and can inform them of the significance of using strategic approaches to constructing, disseminating, and evaluating media initiatives and media messages.

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COURSE: COM FT 303
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Television as an industry, a technology, and a cultural object is currently experiencing a period of accelerated change. Despite the accelerated nature of this change and its amplification through social media discussions, understanding television’s history will help us to understand television’s present. This is a history course with American television as its subject. By exploring the history of television, we also must study the history of radio as television’s precursor medium and television through the digital transition. Thus, the course covers the late 19th century through to the present. The nature of this particular history is heavily reliant on cultural, social, industrial, and political histories, so those will be the foci through which we will study the history of each “new” media–radio and television were once new media, too–as it emerged, stabilized, interacted with other media, was regulated and deregulated, and was shaped by and shaped the culture around it. Moreover, in light of current television practices, we will be exploring television’s national mass-medium foundations and how the origins of broadcasting created an environment that eventually led to today’s fragmented media environment.

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COURSE: COM JO 205
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Provides students with a basic working knowledge of the media required for professional journalism, including photography, sound, video, and editing for production of multimedia packages. No previous experience in visual media is required. Students contribute to the department-managed news service.

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COURSE: CAS HI 408
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Explores, through works of film and literature, human experiences of combat, suffering, and death. Topics range from medieval Japan to Africa, the Americas and Europe, WWI, WWII, and various “small wars” from the 19th through 21st centuries.

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COURSE: COM FT 522
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Intense writing workshop learning how to write professional sitcom scripts. Elements of character, dramatic story structure, how comedy is created, how scenes build and progress a story, formal story outlines, dialogue, the business of sitcom writing, pitching, arc, and comedic premise are analyzed. The class becomes a sitcom writing team for a current hit series and writes an original class spec script to understand the process of group writing employed on most sitcoms. Also, students write their own personal spec scripts with individual conferences with the professor.

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COURSE: COM CM 331
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: (COM CO 201) and First-Year Writing Seminar (e.g. CAS WR 100 or WR 120).

Intensive exposure to some of the basic writing formats in the communications profession: news releases, letters, features, and profiles. Lead writing, editing, and techniques of interviewing. Extensive writing and rewriting. Develops basic writing skills for different audiences.

This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Writing- intensive Course.

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COURSE: COM FT 514
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Explores the development and creation of the television series pilot. Each student pitches a concept and writes a treatment and a finished pilot script for an original series, either comedy or drama. Emphasis on premise, story structure, characterization, and originality. Lectures, screenings, script readings, written assignments, and critiques.

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COURSE: CAS WR 150
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Considering the popular and critical success of works such as The Hunger Games and Handmaid’s Tale, why have dystopian fictions, film, and video games become one of the most celebrated artistic genres of the last decade? What do dystopian worlds have to teach us about the world in which we live today, and to what extent do they serve as warnings about the world to come? This seminar considers how dystopian literature and film both consciously and unconsciously reflect social and cultural anxieties about issues such as bioethics, technological advancement, socioeconomic disparity, and governmental control. We examine underlying assumptions about human nature versus the nature of human institutions and the dystopian genre as a vehicle of social and political critique.

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COURSE: CAS WR 151
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Writing, Research, & Inquiry with Oral and/or Signed Expression. Great speeches inspire and challenge us. Oratory is, in fact, a central component of democracy and democratic culture. This course studies great speeches live, on the page, and in films. What makes a great speech? Are the great speeches of the past still relevant today? Students explore these and other questions by speaking, writing, and researching about famous speeches, orators, oratorical occasions, and theories of public speaking. Works include speeches by Abraham Lincoln, Franklin Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, and Martin Luther King, as well as film adaptations of great speeches and other fictional orations.

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COURSE: CAS WR 152
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Writing, Research, & Inquiry with Digital/Multimedia Expression. Despite claims that we live in a “post-racial” time, the idea of race has undeniable consequences for American citizens and institutions alike. This seminar examines the ways in which the lived experiences of Americans of various backgrounds are represented in contemporary literature and media. What do specific representations reveal about race- and ethnicity-based stereotypes? How do specific representations reflect or counter typical narratives about the conditions of life for people of color in America? How do these representations minimize or celebrate the complexities of experience? Students have the opportunity to consider these questions as they undertake their own research on a particular representation of race/ethnicity in America. Texts may include Vanessa Hua’s Deceit and Other Possibilities, Claudia Rankine’s poetry and essays, and Aziz Ansari’s Master of None.

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COURSE: CAS WR 151
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Writing, Research, & Inquiry with Oral and/or Signed Expression. Why do we adapt books into movies? How does the experience of a story we first encounter as a text change when we see it on screen? Are filmmakers obligated to be “faithful” to their sources, or do they have artistic license to innovate? Is literature an inherently “higher” form of art than movies? This course considers these and other questions about the nature of literature on film and develops students’ skills as critical film readers and as proficient writers and communicators. We analyze the practice of cinematic adaptation by speaking and writing about key examples such as Shakespeare’s Macbeth, August Wilson’s Fences, and J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone. The goal is to produce well-researched, clear, and persuasive communication about the difference that form makes in our encounters with art.

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COURSE: CAS WR 152
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Writing, Research, & Inquiry with Digital/Multimedia Expression. In the sixties and seventies, Vietnam and civil unrest gave birth to a golden age of horror movies. In our new century, we have been forced to confront tragedy and trauma on an even greater scale, from 9/11 to ISIS attacks in Western Europe to threats from the Korean Peninsula. This course examines the horror genre in both film and television as a powerful meditation on the fears and anxieties of a new and uncertain century, including terrorism, chemical and biological warfare, disease pandemic, authoritarianism, and nuclear attack. Examples of horror from America, Europe, and Southeast Asia, including 28 Days Later, Pan’s Labyrinth, and Cloverfield, invite us to consider the problem in a global, cross-cultural context.

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COURSE: SED RS 620
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Overview of the foundations and techniques for conducting action research. Encourages the development of an inquiry stance within the practice of teachers, principals, and other school-based practitioners. Students engage in planning, collecting, and analyzing data through an action research project.

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COURSE: SED DS 502
CREDITS: 2 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Develops important understandings of cognitive, social-emotional, and identity developing during adolescence, as well as the role that educators can play in fostering the mindsets, skillsets, character strengths and contexts that adolescents need to grow into healthy and high-performing adults.

This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Social Inquiry I.

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COURSE: SED LS 565
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

An introduction to contemporary linguistics, including phonological and syntactical theory, sociolinguistics, first- and second-language acquisition, and discourse theory. Also covers applications of various branches of linguistics to education, including issues of different cultures in the classroom, the role of language in education, and the development of literacy.

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COURSE: SED LS 610
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Practical training in teaching pronunciation to improve mutual intelligibility: the ability of English language learners to understand and be understood by others. Pronunciation training is integrated within a framework of current research and latest practices.

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COURSE: SED CE 630
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Focuses on the scientific study of psychological aspects of living a fulfilling and flourishing life. Topics include happiness, empathy, optimism, friendship, goal setting, achievement, emotion, creativity, humor, and mindfulness. Students become familiar with theory and research in this relatively new subfield and critically consider applications to their teaching, coaching, leadership, and/or counseling.

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COURSE: SED ME 525
CREDITS: 2 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Introduces students to the theory and practice of assessment in mathematics. This course prepares teachers to apply research-supported assessment techniques in their classrooms. Discussions about important issues in assessment of students’ mathematical learning is encouraged.

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COURSE: SED CT 534
CREDITS: 2 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

This course is designed to support middle and secondary teachers in developing a practical, effective and low-stress approach to classroom management. The course focuses on a classroom management system with four components: classroom structure, limit-setting, responsibility training, and back-up systems. Participants will develop effective classroom management practices, break current “high cost” and ineffective strategies, and establish a proactive, positive classroom setting that maximizes time on learning and minimizes classroom disruptions.

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COURSE: SED SE 534
CREDITS: 2 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Designed to develop an understanding of the theoretical basis and implementation strategies of effective classroom and behavior management for students with and without disabilities. Positive behavioral intervention and supports (PBIS) is used as the overarching framework for school-wide, classroom, and individualized approaches that are used to build and maintain environments that provide positive and pro-active behavioral supports for all learners.

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COURSE: SED SP 685
CREDITS: 2 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Provides a social, historical, legal and political context for understanding education practice and policies. Addresses issues of equity, access, civil rights, moral and ethical considerations, rights of students, parents and teachers, and the larger purpose of public education in our democracy.

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COURSE: CAS PS 241
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS PS 101).

Critical review of research and theories pertaining to intellectual and social development of infants and children. Role of early experiences and biological factors in later formation of personality, and intellectual and motivational behaviors; includes theories of Erikson, Piaget, and Freud.

Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry I, Critical Thinking.

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COURSE: SED EN 630
CREDITS: 2 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Examines the teaching and learning of humanities in urban schooling and considers how issues of race, gender, class, language, and culture affect the nature of literacy in schools. By linking students’ academic coursework to a field experience with urban adolescents and their teachers, students have the opportunity to co-plan with teachers and work individually, in small groups, and with classes of diverse student populations, including English learners. Students then reflect on how their experiences link to theories and practices being explored in the course.

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COURSE: SED ME 530
CREDITS: 2 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Focuses on the examination of the teaching and learning of mathematics and science in schools with diverse populations. This course considers how race, gender, class, language and culture affect students’ opportunities to learn mathematics and science. Challenges common to urban and rural districts are studied. Instructional activities for teaching mathematics and science to diverse populations are analyzed.

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COURSE: SED AP 526
CREDITS: 2 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Examines the role of schools, families and community agencies and the critical partnerships that must be forged between them to support student learning and well-being. The primary goal of this seminar is to deepen understanding of the systemic obstacles — and possibilities – – to improve our school systems and narrow achievement gaps.

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COURSE: SED CT 526
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Explores the ways that schools can work closely with families, communities, and community agencies to increase connections and mutual assistance. Consistent with DESE regulations, this course emphasizes collaborative relationships with families and with community partners such as youth-serving organizations, health and safety agencies, and other groups and businesses.

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COURSE: SED AP 625
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Explores the dynamic global landscape of higher education, compares and contrasts differing national models, and delves into how U.S. institutions internationalize their efforts and create professional roles on campuses, both here and abroad, that support global programs and students from other countries.

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COURSE: SED AP 612
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Focuses on decision-making in higher education and identifies, from a historical perspective, the changing roles of trustees, faculty, administrators, and students in the governance process. Includes an examination of how external forces influence decisions at a campus level. Accountability of the governing bodies and decision-makers is addressed.

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COURSE: SED CE 500
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Emphasizes understanding of the theoretical basis of counseling. Introduces learning skills involved in helping relationships. Selected readings in counseling theory and practice are assigned. As part of the skill-building process, opportunities are provided for in-class practice and demonstrations.

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COURSE: SED RS 600
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Introduces students to social science research methods including quantitative, qualitative, and mixed method approaches to education inquiry. Students will develop skills in conducting literature searches, reading empirical research studies and applying these methods. Students leave the course better able to critically examine research presented in the mass media, critically engage with research in the workplace, and participate in research-based efforts to improve education.

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COURSE: SED SE 706
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Improves students’ understanding of individuals with disabilities, traces the development of their programs and services, and analyzes and critiques key assumptions, attitudes, and beliefs about special education practices.

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COURSE: SED BI 620
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Focus on complexity of bilingualism, literacy, and schooling from a student, school, and socio-political perspective. Examines the theoretical, historical, research, and legal bases of educational policy and programs for students who speak a language other than the language of the school.

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COURSE: SED ME 504
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Grad Prereq: (SED ME 503).

Designed for students majoring in elementary education, special education and deaf education who are preparing to become teachers of children in grades 1-6. Topics include pre-algebra, proportional reasoning, geometry, measurement, and statistics. The emphasis is on exploring, explaining, and justifying mathematical ideas and connecting these ideas to the elementary classroom.

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COURSE: SED ME 503
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Designed for students majoring in elementary education, special education, and deaf education who are preparing to become teachers of children in grades 1-6. Topics include place value, whole numbers and operations, fractions, decimals, and elementary number theory. The emphasis is on exploring, explaining, and justifying mathematical ideas and connecting these ideas to the elementary classroom.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: SED CE 741
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

A historical, philosophical, and clinical examination of subcultural considerations in counseling psychology professional practice and inquiry.

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COURSE: SED ME 563
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Explores the teaching and learning of mathematics through solving sets of challenging problems. Topics include research on problem solving and how its design and implementation can be supported in the classroom.

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COURSE: CAS PS 234
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS PS 101).

How do we learn to associate stimuli together? How do we learn to associate behaviors with their consequences? How is memory applicable to learning? What are the different memory processes and systems responsible for learning? The aim of this course is to review the major traditional and current theories of learning and memory. Students begin with an understanding of simple learning, including theories and basic principles of classical and operant conditioning. Students then are introduced to the memory system, the three stages of memory, implicit and explicit memory processes.

Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Scientific Inquiry I, Social Inquiry I, Critical Thinking.

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COURSE: SED LR 551
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

For beginning graduate students without experience in the teaching of reading. Study of reading development in childhood and early adolescence, and the implications for teaching and learning. Discussion of theory and research on effective instruction and assessment, and the application of both to teaching.

Not open to students who have completed SED LR 501 or SED LR 503.

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COURSE: SED SE 760
CREDITS: 2 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Designed to develop an understanding of the theories of learning and how these theories have informed the development of instructional strategies that are frequently used with students with disabilities.

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COURSE: SED SE 510
CREDITS: 2 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Designed to develop an understanding of the historical background and legal framework of special education, various disabilities, instructional practices and behavioral support strategies. Focus will be on middle- and high-school students.

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COURSE: SED SE 512
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Students develop an understanding of the core concepts of United States public policy related to the provision of special education and related services to students with disabilities. Particular attention is paid to the historical context, precedent.

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COURSE: SED CE 769
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

A comprehensive overview of the field of substance use and abuse, as well as prevention practices and intervention models. Students learn about substance use within the context of normative development as well as addictive behaviors and their associated interventions

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COURSE: SED TL 520
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Focuses on current theory/research related to teaching English language learners and the implications for effective language, literacy, and content-area assessment and instructional practices in sheltered English immersion classrooms. For students seeking licensure in Early Childhood, Elementary, and Special Education.

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COURSE: SED TL 525
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Focuses on current theory/research related to teaching English language learners and the implications for effective language, literacy, and content- area assessment and instructional practices in Sheltered English Immersion (SEI) classrooms in middle/high schools. For students seeking licensure in the content areas at the 5-12 level.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: SED CE 847
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

A conceptual and experiential introduction to group dynamics. Participation in an ongoing training group while studying the dynamics of group development. Covers group counseling approaches and models, issues of small group leadership, and styles of leadership. Treatment of group counseling goals, composition, phases, and research.

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COURSE: SED AP 615
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Examines theories of students’ personal and social development in college as well as emerging research on student learning in college. Students employ a theory-to- practice approach that uses campus environment theories to cultivate safe, inclusive, and engaging communities of learning.

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COURSE: SED SE 535
CREDITS: 2 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Describes the defining characteristics, school experiences, and evidence-based practices for teaching and supporting individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The course includes perspectives from individuals with ASD and their families.

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COURSE: CAS WR 152
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Writing, Research, & Inquiry with Digital/Multimedia Expression. Higher education is at a moment of cultural crisis, as stakeholders from parents to politicians question the goals, strategies, and experiences of college. This seminar invites the student, as principal stakeholder, to weigh in on this debate. What is it like to be a college student today? What are the challenges, both visible and hidden? What are the overlooked rewards? This seminar explores questions about the culture of college as reflected through students’ experience at Boston University. Students draw on a range of research methods to investigate aspects of their BU experience, from what they study to what they eat. Texts include scholarly articles by writers such as Peter Arnett, Jean Twenge, and Pierre Bourdieu; contemporary journalism; and primary sources that students produce, including photos and surveys.

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COURSE: CAS BI 525 / CAS NE 525
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS NE 102 or CAS BI 203) and (CAS NE 203 or CAS BI 325).

An in- depth look at molecular mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases and their impact and relevance in clinical diagnosis and treatment. Topics include the molecular pathways of Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, and Creutzfeldt- Jacob Disease, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. Students must attend both lecture and discussion.

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COURSE: SAR HS 300
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Examines the distribution of health and diseases across the population, and the factors that impact health. Which group of people is more likely to experience a heart attack or develop diabetes? Do our level of education and our income impact our health and our life expectancy? This course studies how we approach understanding disease distribution within the population. It covers the principles and methods used in epidemiology, particularly as it relates to public health, including the types of study designs used in health research, disease screening, and infectious disease outbreak investigation.

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COURSE: SAR AT 510
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (SAR HS 369 or SAR HS 581). MSAT students only. Coreq: (SAR AT 520).

This three-semester course sequence provides the student a process for prevention, examination, diagnosis, and treatment of patients. The course begins with the study of the basic principles and underlying theories relating to examination and treatment techniques and applies them to examination, diagnosis, and management of patients in acute distress. Includes certification in emergency cardiac care. Students must register for two sections: lecture and laboratory.

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COURSE: SAR HS 342 / SAR HS 542
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS BI 211 or CAS BI 315) or consent of instructor.

Application of physiological principles under different exercise conditions. Integration of the body systems in performance of exercise, work, and sports; immediate and long range effects of these activities on the body. Laboratory includes the measurement of physiological parameters under exercise conditions. Students must register for two sections: lecture and a laboratory.

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COURSE: MET UA 527
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Examines historical and contemporary issues involved in providing food to cities and metropolitan areas. Tracing the routes that food takes into the city and the major sources of food, the course looks closely at the accessibility of food, especially in poorer urban neighborhoods. Among topics covered are obesigenic neighborhoods, food deserts, gentrification and foodie culture, public school food nutrition, attempts to minimize food waste, and immigrants and ethnic foods in the city. The course also considers recent attempts at food production in cities, including urban agriculture, vertical farming, and craft production of food products. After closely looking at the history and current status of food programs, the course concludes with a consideration of urban food policies.

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COURSE: CAS WR 120
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

This course examines and reflects on the contemporary relevance of ethical questions that have arisen in the public health arena over the last hundred years. Topics include race medicine; the eugenics movement in the United States and the related 1927 Supreme Court case, Buck v. Bell; and the evolution of restrictions on interracial marriage, eventually overturned by the 1967 case Loving v. Virginia. These issues are discussed with an eye toward their relevance to contemporary debates about public health.

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COURSE: SAR AT 520 / SAR PT 520
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (SAR HS 369 or SAR HS 581). Coreq: (SAR AT 510 / SAR PT 515).

Builds on previous knowledge of human musculoskeletal anatomy to examine human movement. Principles of biomechanics, connective tissue behavior, and muscle physiology are integrated with joint structure and function to form the basis of understanding normal and pathological movement. Students must register for two sections: lecture and discussion.

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COURSE: CAS BI 383
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS BI 281 & CAS BI 282) and enrollment in Seven-Year Liberal Arts/Medical Education Program.

An introduction to physiological principles applied across the levels of organization (cell, tissue, organ systems). Intended to prepare the student for more advanced courses in physiology. Topics include homeostasis and neural, muscle, cardiopulmonary, renal, endocrine, metabolic, and reproductive physiology. Students must register for two sections: lecture and laboratory.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: SAR HS 400 / CAS WS 400
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS WR 120) or equivalent.

This course focuses on strengthening students’ knowledge, skills, and ability to construct a critical appraisal of all the determinants, distribution, causes, mechanisms, systems, and consequences of health inequities related to gender. Emphasis is placed on the historical perspective of women as both recipients and providers of health care, including an exploration of psychological, physiological, social, and political barriers to women’s health and professional life as healthcare providers. The course provides both theoretical and topical coverage of gender and its influence on healthcare, both at the system and individual level. It explores how gender influences and is influenced by healthcare systems through an exploration of some of the major historical, social, and scientific developments that have determined contemporary issues.

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COURSE: SAR HS 581
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: ((CAS BI 105 & CAS BI 106) or (CAS BI 107 & CAS BI 108)) and (CAS BI 211 or CAS BI 315).

Regional approach to the musculoskeletal, peripheral nervous, and circulatory systems of the human body. Laboratories reinforce the lectures by a study of osteology, prosected cadavers, and live anatomy palpations. Students must register for two sections: lecture and a laboratory.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS BI 210
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS BI 105) or equivalent.

Intensive preprofessional course for students whose programs require anatomy. Not for biology major or minor credit. Gross structure of the human body; skeletal, muscular, nervous, respiratory, circulatory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Students must register for two sections: lecture and a laboratory.

Carries natural science divisional credit (with lab) in CAS. Cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title formerly numbered CAS BI 106.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS BI 114
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

A study of the world’s major human diseases, their causes, effects on history, pathology, and cures. Principles of immunology. Emphasis on present maladies such as AIDS, herpes, cancer, mononucleosis, tuberculosis, influenza, and hepatitis. This course is appropriate for non-majors and students in the health and paramedical sciences. Students must register for two sections: lecture and laboratory.

Carries natural science divisional credit (with lab) in CAS. Not for Biology major or minor credit. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area(s): Scientific Inquiry I, Quantitative Reasoning II, Critical Thinking.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: SAR HS 251 / SAR HS 551
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS BI 105 or CAS BI 108).

An introduction to nutrition with a focus on the relationship between diet and health. Basic scientific information is presented in preparation for a discussion of applied issues such as weight management and prevention of chronic disease. Emphasis is placed on translation of current dietary recommendations to actual food choices.

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COURSE: CAS BI 211
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: ((CAS BI 105 or CAS BI 108) and (CAS BI 106 or CAS BI 210)) or equivalent. Some knowledge of chemistry and anatomy is assumed. Intended mainly for students in health sciences. Not for biology major or minor credit; Biology majors/minors should take CAS BI 315.

Introduction to principles of systemic mammalian physiology with special reference to humans. Students must register for two sections: lecture and laboratory.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: SAR HS 210
CREDITS: 2 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

This course demonstrates how to access information resources in the biomedical sciences, including hard copy, on-line databases (e.g., LexisNexis, PubMed, OVID), and web searching and how to critically evaluate these information sources. Classes are hands-on learning using laptops.

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COURSE: SAR HS 325
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Provides students with an overview of the complex social, economic, political, environmental, and biological factors that structure the origins, consequences, and possible treatments of illness worldwide, as well as the promotion of health. Students learn about the major themes and concepts shaping the interdisciplinary field of global health, and gain an understanding of solutions to health challenges that have been successfully implemented in different parts of the world. Major topics include the linkages between global health and economic development, the global burden of disease, key actors in global health, and lessons learned from the HIV/AIDS pandemic.

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COURSE: CAS NE 101
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

An introduction to the biological basis of behavior and cognition. Includes theoretical and practical foundations rooted in psychology, biology, neuropharmacology, and clinical sciences (e.g., neurology and neuropsychiatry). Neuroethical dilemmas are highlighted and integrated when relevant to discussion topics.

Carries natural sciences divisional credit without lab in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Scientific Inquiry I.

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COURSE: CAS AN 210
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

This lecture and discussion-driven course uses ethnographic case materials and active learning strategies to introduce students to socio-cultural anthropological modes of understanding and analyzing health-related experiences and institutions, including political and ethical dimensions of illness and suffering around the globe.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry II, Ethical Reasoning, Research and Information Literacy.

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COURSE: CAS PH 251
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Surveys ethical issues that arise in connection with medicine and emerging biotechnologies. The course examines topics such as the right to healthcare, research on human subjects, euthanasia, abortion, cloning, genetic selection, disabilities, and the biomedical enhancement of human capacities. Students can expect to gain not only training in the concepts and methods of moral philosophy and the logic of argumentation, but also the resources needed for assessing ethically difficult questions that healthcare professionals routinely face.

Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Philosophical Inquiry and Life’s Meanings, Ethical Reasoning, Critical Thinking.

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COURSE: SAR HS 441
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) are a group of viral, parasitic, and bacterial diseases that affect more than 1 billion people worldwide and disproportionately burden those with the fewest resources. They can cause significant disability, chronic illness, and death in both children and adults. This course provides an overview of each of the NTDs including transmission, disease progression, treatment, epidemiology, and control strategies. In addition, we examine their public health importance and the effects they have at the individual, community, and national level. We also discuss societal contexts and ethics around treatment, research, advocacy, and prevention.

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COURSE: SAR HP 353
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: First-Year Writing Seminar.

The focus of this interdisciplinary course is on increasing students’ understanding of the health care system and ability to work in interdisciplinary teams, and on the social, environmental, and behavioral factors that affect health care. Students will actively engage in individual work, group discussion, and teamwork through written, oral, and website assignments.

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COURSE: SAR PT 515
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (SAR HS 369 or SAR HS 581). Coreq: (SAR PT 520).

Designed to teach the process of examination by physical therapists. Selected measurement tools used for examination of individuals in order to establish a physical therapy diagnosis are taught. A Systems Approach to examination is introduced and models of disablement are used to guide the process. The course is taught in conjunction with SAR PT 520, Functional Anatomy, and directly applies content learned in that course. DPT students only. Students must register for two sections: lecture and a laboratory.

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COURSE: MET UA 510
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Special Topics in Urban Affairs. Since the mid-1800s, scientists and researchers have continuously shown how public policies significantly impact the health of individuals now and in the future. Through readings, case studies, guest lectures, and in-class exercises, students learn about the lasting impacts of many of these policies. Students are also introduced to a variety of strategies used to design interventions that target urban problems and to the role of evidence in the policymaking process. This course is well suited for curious students with an introductory background in planning, public health, and related fields.

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COURSE: CAS SO 215
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Social, cultural, and intercultural factors in health and illness. Training and socialization of medical professionals, roots of medical power and authority, organization and operation of health care facilities. U.S. health care system and its main problems. Comparison of health care systems in the U.S. and in other countries.

Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry I, Ethical Reasoning.

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COURSE: CAS BI 315
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS BI 108 or ENG BE 209) and (CAS CH 101) and (CAS CH 102) or equivalent.

An introduction to physiological principles applied across all levels of organization (cell, tissue, organ system). Preparation for more advanced courses in physiology. Topics include homeostasis and neural, muscle, respiratory, cardiovascular, renal, endocrine, gastrointestinal, and metabolic physiology. Students must register for two sections: lecture and laboratory.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: MET SO 501
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Special Topics in Sociology. A socio-cultural history of Boston’s North End that examines changes in the area from the first Puritan settlement to the current period of gentrification, with central attention given to the dynamics of culture change among the Italian immigrants. Covers the impact of global changes on local processes, changes in American notions of identity and inclusion, and ethnic succession and competition; religious change, social organization, and Catholic festivals; William Foote Whyte’s “Street Corner Society”; myths and realities of “the Mafia” and impact of urban decline and drug violence in the North End in the 70s and 80s; tourism, food marketing, and gentrification. Course includes two visits to the North End, including dinner in a North End restaurant on the final night of the course.

There is an additional USD $100 fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS WR 112
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS WR 097 or CAS WR 111) or placement test results.

Emphasis on critical reading and analytical writing in response to various theme-based texts. Review of grammar and mechanics in context. Intensive practice in the patterns of academic argumentation through multiple writing assignments of increasing complexity. Refinement of speaking skills through discussions and oral presentations.

This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy.

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COURSE: CAS EN 533
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

A survey of American literature from its (contested) beginnings through the mid-nineteenth century. Focuses on fiction, poetry, and autobiography from major authors (including Melville, Hawthorne, Dickinson, Whitman, Douglass, and Thoreau). Also briefly encounters other genres such as sermons, essays, and exploration narratives. Among our lines of inquiry are these: How do political and philosophical questions shape literary forms and styles (and vice-versa)? How do authors write themselves into (and out of) literary traditions, particularly in matters of influence? And how do the roots (and routes) of early American literature continue on in twentieth- and twenty-first-century U.S. literature?

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COURSE: SED DE 570
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Introductory course that provides non-native signers an opportunity to study American Sign Language as a foreign second language. Emphasizes developing receptive skills. An introduction to Deaf culture is presented through instruction and activities.

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COURSE: SED DE 571
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (SED DE 570).

This course expands on the introduction to American Sign Language (ASL) and Deaf culture, focusing on frequently used signs, basic rules of grammar, non- manual aspects of ASL, fingerspelling, and cultural features of the Deaf community.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Individual in Community, Oral and/or Signed Communication.

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COURSE: SED LS 565
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

An introduction to contemporary linguistics, including phonological and syntactical theory, sociolinguistics, first- and second-language acquisition, and discourse theory. Also covers applications of various branches of linguistics to education, including issues of different cultures in the classroom, the role of language in education, and the development of literacy.

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COURSE: CAS EN 323
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS EN 322).

Overview of English literature between 1700 and 1900. Topics include London as urban center, modern prose fiction, Romantic and Victorian poetry, tensions between religion and science. Authors may include Pope, Swift, Wordsworth, Austen, Dickens, Tennyson, and Wilde.

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COURSE: CAS RN 210
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

A historical and critical introduction to the major themes of Buddhist thought and practice in India and Southeast Asia, with special attention to the transmission of Buddhism to Tibet and the modern West.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy, Critical Thinking.

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COURSE: CAS AH 393
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Explores the terms of debate, key figures, and primary sites for the production and reception of contemporary art on a global scale since 1980. Painting, installation art, new media, performance, art criticism, and curatorial practice are discussed.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Historical Consciousness.

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COURSE: SED DE 551
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Representative fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama depicted in readings and videotapes related to everyday lives of Deaf people. Develops insight and appreciation of Deaf literature and ASL folklore and their implications for education.

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COURSE: CAS EN 373
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

A survey of crime and detective fiction from the late 18th to the late 20th centuries, in the British and American traditions. Reading, discussion, exams, and written work focus on masters of the genre, including Poe, Doyle, Christie, Sayers, Hammett, Chandler, and Cain.

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COURSE: CAS LY 112
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS LY 111).

Advances proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic to the Beginner High level. Expands vocabulary repertoire. Students practice speaking, listening, reading, and writing using engaging materials and real-life communicative activities.

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COURSE: CAS EN 552
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

The heritage of Marlowe and Shakespeare: the collapse of a historic world; Jacobean pessimism and decadence in the plays of Webster, Middleton, Ford, and others.

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COURSE: CAS PH 248
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Examines how existentialist thinkers grappled with some of the most problematic aspects of the human condition.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Philosophical Inquiry and Life’s Meanings, Ethical Reasoning, Critical Thinking.

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COURSE: CAS WR 120
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

This course examines jazz music, with a focus on Boston as a leading center for jazz in the US. Topics include the evolution and history of jazz; its spread to different regions of the country; its major genres or movements; great jazz musicians, bandleaders, and critics; connections between jazz and other musical genres; and the development of jazz in Boston, with special attention to Boston’s musicians, musical styles, schools, and clubs, both past and present. Course materials are drawn from a variety of genres and modes, including concerts, concert reviews, video and audio recordings, historical accounts, and scholarly articles.

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COURSE: CAS WR 120
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

This course examines and reflects on the contemporary relevance of ethical questions that have arisen in the public health arena over the last hundred years. Topics include race medicine; the eugenics movement in the United States and the related 1927 Supreme Court case, Buck v. Bell; and the evolution of restrictions on interracial marriage, eventually overturned by the 1967 case Loving v. Virginia. These issues are discussed with an eye toward their relevance to contemporary debates about public health.

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COURSE: CAS WR 120
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

“Nothing is at last sacred but the integrity of your own mind.” So wrote Ralph Waldo Emerson, expressing a sentiment that seems native to the American character. From mountain men to entrepreneurs, from pioneers to beatniks, from suffragettes to senators, Americans have identified with roles that are individualistic, independent, and self-reliant. This seminar investigates the degree to which this attitude is rooted and reflected in our literary tradition. Readings will include Thoreau’s “Civil Disobedience,” Ginsburg’s “Howl,” and Twain’s Huckleberry Finn.

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COURSE: CAS WR 120
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

This course looks at how our use of language and the form of our language has changed because of technology. From the pen to the phone to the Internet, our use of language is influenced by the changes in technology around us. Through the production of verbal and non-verbal artifacts, students learn how to master a variety of discourse and research methods, how to read various cultural texts, and how to produce their own texts in response. Readings will include Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close by Jonathan Safran Foer and Alone Together – Why we expect more from Technology and Less from Each Other by Sherry Turkle.

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COURSE: CAS WR 120
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Muriel Ruykeyser once said, “The world is made of stories, not of atoms.” This seminar takes Rukeyser’s quote as a guide and examines the world through the lens of short fiction. Does literature reflect or direct society? What insights can we glean about a culture or period from reading? What choices do writers make and what is the effect of different styles or techniques of writing? We look to the answer these questions through several great American short stories including Ernest Hemingway’s “Hills Like White Elephants,” Flannery O’Conner’s “A Good Man is Hard to Find,” and Truman Capote’s “Miriam.”

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COURSE: CAS WR 120
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

This seminar examines the construction of the self in graphic memoirs. It explores this visual-textual form of autobiographical writing and engages in important conversations about the blurry boundary between truth and fiction, past and present, public and private. The course also analyzes how graphic choices contribute to the evolving construction of the author’s identity. Exposure to graphic self-writing in print and online allows students to consider how form and style impact both the author’s voice and the reader’s experience. Students also have the opportunity to develop their own “graphic self” through regular drawing and reading response exercises, which culminate in the creation of short graphic memoirs. Readings may include Art Spiegelman’s Maus, Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis, David Small’s Stitches, and Allie Brosh’s Hyperbole and a Half, along with supplementary scholarly articles and theoretical texts.

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COURSE: CAS WR 120
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

The twentieth century witnessed drastic changes in politics, culture, science, and technology, as well as global-scale wars. This course examines how poets represent and react to such tumultuous times. It looks at some of the major events that shape the century and considers how poets of the period represent gender, ethnicity, culture, politics, and art. The course explores questions that seem particularly relevant to our own time: How do we define and represent gender? How do ethnic minorities live in hostile communities? What is the relationship between art and politics? Includes poems by Stein, Loy, Millay, Pound, Stevens, Auden, Owen, Yeats, Hughes, McKay, Cullen, and Dunbar, as well as selected poems in translation.

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COURSE: CAS LF 111
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

A multimedia approach for students who have never studied French. A variety of communicative tasks develop speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills.

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COURSE: CAS LF 112
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: (CAS LF 111) or placement test results. Continues CAS LF 111.

A multimedia approach which develops speaking, reading, writing, and listening skills, together with the grammar and vocabulary needed for more complex communicative tasks.

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COURSE: CAS LF 211
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS LF 112) or placement test results.

Advances proficiency in speaking, writing, reading, and listening in a communicative classroom setting. Grammar is studied in context, through thematic discussions on topics such as daily life and Francophone culture, through short readings, and through diverse written tasks.

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COURSE: CAS LF 212
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: (CAS LF 211) or placement test results.

Advances four skills proficiency in a communicative classroom setting. Grammar is used in context through thematic discussions, the reading of a short novel, and in diverse written tasks.

Fulfills CAS language requirement, prepares for Level 1 Advanced Courses (CAS LF 307 — LF 311). This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy

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COURSE: CAS AR 100
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 3

Illustrated lectures focus on the important discoveries of the discipline of archaeology. Course covers the whole of human prehistory around the world. Archaeological methods are described, along with the great ancient sites: Olduvai, Lascaux, Stonehenge, Egyptian pyramids, Machu Picchu.

This course carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. Course fulfills Archaeology Undergraduate area requirement. This course fulfills one unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, Social Inquiry I.

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COURSE: CAS HI 287
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Analysis of the history of American foreign policy from the perspective of the changing world and regional international systems; emphasis on the effect of these systems and the impact of America on the creation and operation of international systems.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, Social Inquiry II.

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COURSE: CAS PH 300
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

The history of ancient Greek philosophy from its beginnings through Aristotle: the cosmos, human nature, Socrates and Plato, metaphysics, music, atomic theories, immortality, friendship, love, being and nonbeing, civil disobedience, form and formlessness, definitions, and the hierarchy of reality.

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COURSE: CAS IR 350
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

What are the causes and consequences of the global Cold War? How was the twentieth-century international system transformed by East-West conflict, North-South disparity and South-South cooperation and competition? What lessons can be drawn from this recent past? These are some of the questions examined by this course. The course contextualizes present-day international and regional conflicts and cooperation in the recent past, collectively analyzes primary source documents, and discusses policy implications.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy, Research and Information Literacy.

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COURSE: CAS IR 349
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

What were the causes and the consequences of the two World Wars? What was the nature of political, economic, and military relations among the major powers of the world from the beginning of the twentieth century to the end of the Second World War? What was the effect of domestic factors (political, economic, religious, and ideological) on the foreign policies of individual states? Seeking to provide a genuinely multinational perspective on world affairs, this course assesses the ways in which powerful nation-states in this period competed and cooperated in the international system.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy, Research and Information Literacy.

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COURSE: CAS HI 201
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Traces the evolution of medieval civilization from the fourth to the fourteenth centuries. Emphasizes three main themes: the political and social development of western Europe, the evolution of Latin Christianity, and the role of popular culture.

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COURSE: CAS HI 280
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Special Topics in American History. Examines the role of popular music in American culture. Studies the origin and growth of the music industry, and attempts to integrate it into the general social and intellectual history of the country. The emphasis is on rock ‘n’ roll and its impact on America from 1954-1970.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS AH 389
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Impressionism, its sources, and its aftermath, from the painting of modern life and leisure by Manet, Monet, Morisot, Renoir, and Degas, to the evocation of spirituality, pain, and desire in the work of Van Gogh, Gauguin, Rodin, and Munch.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Historical Consciousness.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS EN 370
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Topic for July 2019: Toni Morrison’s American Times. Examines four of the Nobel Laureate’s novels, using primary and secondary materials to construct historical contexts and critical perspectives.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS AR 101
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Theory, methods and aims of prehistoric and historical archaeology in the Old and New Worlds. Excavation and recovery of archaeological data; dating techniques; interpretation of finds; relation of archaeology to history and other disciplines. Examination of several Old and New World cultures.

Course provides divisional studies credit in CAS Social Sciences. Course required for major and minor in Archaeology. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, Social Inquiry I.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS AH 111
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

An introduction to art history and the analysis of painting, sculpture, and architecture. Study of masterpieces from prehistoric to medieval times. Focus on monuments of Greece, Rome, and the Middle Ages, with a survey of Egyptian and Near Eastern art.

Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Historical Consciousness.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS AH 112
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Major monuments and artists. Sequential development, from the Renaissance to the modern period, of major styles in architecture, sculpture, painting, graphic arts, and photography. Relationship of visual art to social and cultural trends.

Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Historical Consciousness.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: COM CO 201
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: (CAS WR 100 or WR 120) or equivalent.

The College of Communication’s core undergraduate writing course. Students refresh their grammatical and stylistic skills and apply those skills to professional writing assignments. Prepares students to write with clarity, conciseness, precision, and accuracy for the communication fields.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Writing-Intensive Course, Oral and/or Signed Communication, Research and Information Literacy.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS EN 202
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

An exploration of creative writing: fiction, poetry, and possibly creative non-fiction and/or playwriting. Students learn to read like writers (that is, with an eye towards how writers write) and write and revise their own original stories and poems. This class is run as a workshop, so students will share and critique each others’ work. Does not give concentration credit.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS EN 143
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Introduction to the understanding, interpretation, and appreciation of a wide range of drama from different eras and diverse places, from the festivals of ancient Greece to the twenty-first century Broadway stage. We consider extraordinary plays from Renaissance England, nineteenth- century Europe, and twentieth-century Africa and the United States. Likely works include Antigone, Macbeth, A Doll’s House, Death and The King’s Horseman, Angels in America, Top Dog / Underdog and Hamilton. Focus on theater as a distinctive, developing artistic form, with explorations of political and aesthetic contexts. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same number that was previously titled “Literary Types: Drama.”

Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS PH 150
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Many of us want to lead meaningful lives. But what is it for a life to be meaningful? What makes some lives better or more meaningful than others? Can life as a whole have some significance or meaning?

Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Philosophical Inquiry and Life’s Meanings, Ethical Reasoning, Critical Thinking.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS PH 100
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Introduces the nature of philosophical activity through careful study of major philosophical topics. Topics may include the nature of reality, knowledge, God’s existence, and the significance of human life.

Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Philosophical Inquiry and Life’s Meanings, Ethical Reasoning, Critical Thinking.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS RN 100
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Religion matters. It makes meaning and provides structure to life, addressing fundamental questions about body, spirit, community, and time. But what is it? How does it work in our world? This course explores religion in ritual, philosophical, experiential, and ethical dimensions.

Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area(s): Philosophical Inquiry and Life’s Meanings, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy, Creativity/Innovation.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS AH 220
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Examines key monuments of Islamic art and architecture within their historical and cultural context, and emphasizes the diversity within the visual cultures of the Islamic world.

Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy, Research and Information Literacy.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS LI 111
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

For students who have never studied Italian, or by placement test results. Introduction to grammatical structures used in written exercises. Emphasis on aural comprehension, speaking, and pronunciation. Readings on contemporary Italian culture. Meets four days a week. Lab required.

(If CAS LI 131 or a more advanced college-level course has been completed, this course cannot be taken for credit.)

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS LI 112
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS LI 111) or placement test results.

Continues study of basic grammatical structures used in written assignments. Emphasis on speaking, aural comprehension, and pronunciation. Readings on contemporary Italian culture. Meets four days a week. Lab required.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS LI 211
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS LI 112) or placement test results.

Intended for students with a satisfactory background in elementary Italian who wish to continue study of grammatical structures. Emphasis on speaking, pronunciation, and aural comprehension. Reading about Italian culture and contemporary short stories. Compositions and oral assessments including interviews and/or presentations.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS LJ 111
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Introduction to spoken and written Japanese and to fundamentals of Japanese grammar with oral drills and written exercises.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS LJ 112
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS LJ 111) or equivalent.

Introduction to spoken and written Japanese and to fundamentals of Japanese grammar with oral drills and written exercises.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS LJ 211
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS LJ 112) or equivalent.

Elaboration and refinement of the fundamental skills introduced in CAS LJ 111 and LJ 112 with an introduction to reading and composition.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS LJ 212
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS LJ 211) or equivalent.

Elaboration and refinement of the fundamental skills introduced in CAS LJ 111 and LJ 112 with an introduction to reading and composition. Satisfactory completion of CAS LJ 212 fulfills the CAS language requirement.

This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS LK 111
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

For beginners or according to placement exam. Fundamentals of Korean speaking, listening, reading, writing.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS CL 111
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Introduction to grammar, forms, and vocabulary of classical Latin.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS AH 242
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Surveys Latin American art from the colonial period to present and relates it to imperial, state, institutional, and private agendas. Interrogates both notions of art within colonial/neo-colonial contexts and changing roles of artists over past half-millennia.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Historical Consciousness.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS PH 251
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Surveys ethical issues that arise in connection with medicine and emerging biotechnologies. The course examines topics such as the right to healthcare, research on human subjects, euthanasia, abortion, cloning, genetic selection, disabilities, and the biomedical enhancement of human capacities. Students can expect to gain not only training in the concepts and methods of moral philosophy and the logic of argumentation, but also the resources needed for assessing ethically difficult questions that healthcare professionals routinely face.

Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Philosophical Inquiry and Life’s Meanings, Ethical Reasoning, Critical Thinking.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS PH 155
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

What is justice? What are the foundations of property rights, liberty, and equality? Are anarchism and utopianism defensible? This course is an introduction to major themes and questions in political philosophy. It includes a study of classical and modern texts, as well as contemporary political issues.

Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Philosophical Inquiry and Life’s Meanings, Ethical Reasoning, Critical Thinking.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS EN 125
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: First Year Writing Seminar (e.g., WR 100 or WR 120).

Introduces key concepts for understanding major developments in modern literature. Readings in poetry, drama, and fiction from varying traditions, designed to motivate an interest in some of the most engaging, and challenging, works of our time. Topics vary by instructor.

Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Writing- intensive Course.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS PH 160
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

A systematic study of the principles of both deductive and informal reasoning, calculated to enhance students’ actual reasoning skills, with an emphasis on reasoning and argumentation in ordinary discourse. We will emphasize argumentation and criticism in ordinary life and also present formal models of reasoning designed to elicit underlying patterns and structures of reasoning and argumentation that are widely applicable. Includes simultaneous training in the skills of argument analysis, argument pattern recognition, argument construction, and argument interpretation and creation.

This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area(s): Philosophical Inquiry and Life’s Meanings, Critical Thinking.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS IR 337 / CAS PO 379 / CAS RN 379
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Introduction to the comparative study of the political role of religious institutions and beliefs. Covers issues such as religion’s relationship to violence and terrorism, democracy and human rights, group identity, gender and sexuality, and modernity and secularism.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS RN 103
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Study of Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, and Shinto. Focus on the world view of each tradition and the historical development of that world view.

Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy, Critical Thinking.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS LC 287
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Major Chinese films interpreted in light of modern Chinese history and culture. Focuses on questions of national and cultural identity in films from the 1980s to the present day by directors from Mainland China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong. In English.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS EN 220
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Friendship is essential to many of our lives. But ideas about friendship have changed over time. To take one famous example, Tennyson’s oft-quoted lines “‘Tis better to have loved and lost/ Than never to have loved,” were written about a close friend. What is the nature of such love? This course explores literary languages of friendship from Renaissance depictions of the “friend zone,” to Victorian frenemies, to the often-fractured landscape of contemporary America. Authors may include Shakespeare, Austen, Oscar Wilde, August Wilson, Frank O’Hara, and Jim Jarmusch.

Required of concentrators in English. Satisfies CAS WR 150 requirement. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Writing, Research and Inquiry, Research and Information Literacy.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS EN 363
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Six plays chosen from the following: Richard II, Henry IV (Part I), Troilus and Cressida, As You Like It, Hamlet, Othello, Antony and Cleopatra, and The Winter’s Tale.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS EN 364
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Six or seven plays chosen from the following: Richard III, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Romeo and Juliet, The Merchant of Venice, Much Ado About Nothing, Measure for Measure, King Lear, Macbeth, Coriolanus, and The Tempest.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS LS 111
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

For students who have never studied Spanish, or by placement test results. Introduction to grammatical structures. Emphasis on aural comprehension, speaking, and pronunciation. Introduction to Hispanic culture.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS LS 112
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: (CAS LS 111) or placement test results.

Completes study of basic grammatical structures. Emphasis on speaking and aural comprehension. Readings on contemporary Hispanic culture. Writing assignments.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS LS 211
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: (CAS LS 112) or placement test results.

Completes study of grammatical structures of Spanish. Use of spoken language in conversation. Reading in Hispanic civilization and of contemporary short stories. Writing exercises involving more complex grammatical and syntactical patterns.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS LS 212
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: (CAS LS 211) or placement test results.

Review of the structures of Spanish. Intensive practice of spoken language. More advanced readings from Hispanic culture. Frequent compositions.

Satisfactory completion of CAS LS 212 fulfills the CAS language requirement. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS EN 582
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Topic for Summer 2019: Skepticism, Faith, and Fiction After WWII. “Nihilism stands at the door,” Nietzsche famously said in the 1880s, and he defined “nihilism” as the condition in which “the highest values devaluate themselves. The aim is lacking; ‘why?’ finds no answer.” In the years after World War II–after global economic collapse, after the concentration camps and the Bomb, as religious traditions lost their grip ever more–Nietzsche’s prophecy seemed to many people to have been realized. Yet in the face of this radically skeptical condition, many authors sought what Nietzsche called “the new arts of enduring it.” They sought, that is, forms of art and storytelling that might confront and acknowledge the dislocations of modern history and yet also express some sort of faith–some affirmation in the face of anomie, a glimpse of new “highest values,” a provisional answer to the question of “why?” This course will examine the remarkable variety of forms that such responses have taken, from experimental theater to southern Gothic fiction and lyrical late modernism to postmodern satire. Authors addressed may include Samuel Beckett, Peter Weiss, James Baldwin, Flannery O’Connor, Walker Percy, Marilynne Robinson, Cynthia Ozick, Don DeLillo, and J. M. Coetzee.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS RN 101
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Introduction to the great canonical anthologies of Jews and Christians. Students will learn to read for historical context and genre conventions; study classical and modern strategies of interpretation; and create a collaborative commentary or piece of “fan-fiction.”

Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Historical Consciousness, Creativity/Innovation.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS HI 102
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

What is Europe? This course explores the emergence of Europe as an idea and place. It draws on literature and art from Machiavelli to Russian ballet to explain Europe’s changing meaning; focuses on nation- and state-building to explain Europe’s shifting boundaries.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS HI 152
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

After the Civil War, Americans created a new urbanizing and industrializing landscape, flush with immigrants, growing class conflict, and racial divisions. This course explores how, through times of prosperity, depression, and war, Americans transformed the United States into one of the world’s leading nations.

This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area(s): Historical Consciousness, Research and Information Literacy.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS CL 208 / CAS LX 208
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Surveys ancient and medieval Indo-European languages and cultures. English, Irish, Hindi, Russian, Armenian, and Farsi languages are all related and belong to Indo-European family: they descended from a common ancestor, Proto-Indo-European. The course reconstructs this protolanguage using the historical-comparative method.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS CL 102
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

An introduction to the world of the ancient Romans, as viewed in their literature, culture, and art. Discusses their origins, army, family life, religion, and education, and their legacy in our own time.

Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, Social Inquiry I, Critical Thinking.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS AA 305
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Examines four of the Nobel Laureate’s novels, using primary and secondary materials to construct historical contexts and critical perspectives.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS AH 201
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Introduces a range of approaches to understanding architecture in an historical perspective. Learn how architects and others have interpreted meaning through rubrics of art, nature, and culture, focused upon European and American architecture from 1400 to the present.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Historical Consciousness, Research and Information Literacy.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS HI 408
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Explores, through works of film and literature, human experiences of combat, suffering, and death. Topics range from medieval Japan to Africa, the Americas and Europe, WWI, WWII, and various “small wars” from the 19th through 21st centuries.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS HI 277
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

The past may tell us about the future of war. This course studies the lessons of wars past to correct current falsehoods and persistent myths about war in the wider culture. Students learn to separate popular myths from the realities of war.

This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Historical Consciousness.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS EN 301
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Students write nonfiction pieces for critique and learn principles of narrative through readings. Focus is on writing about people, place, events, one’s personal history, among other subjects. Individual conferences with the instructor. For writers of all experience levels.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS EN 305
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

An in-depth exploration of fiction writing. Students learn to read like writers (that is, with an eye towards how writers write) and write and revise their own original stories. This class is run as a workshop, so students will share and critique each others’ work.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS EN 304
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

An in-depth exploration of writing poetry. Students learn to read poems closely (that is, with an eye towards learning how a poem is made) and write and revise their own original poetry. This class is run as a workshop, so students will share and critique each others’ poems. Note that for this summer offering, CAS EN 304 does NOT require a writing sample or permission of the instructor.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS WR 151
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Writing, Research, & Inquiry with Oral and/or Signed Expression. In this course, students look at and listen to a number of albums by critically acclaimed singer-songwriters, with an emphasis on the song lyrics and the ways in which individual songs work together to produce a cohesive album. We analyze albums by contemporary songwriters chosen by the class and make use of up-to-date resources like the Tiny Desk Concert series from NPR’s All Songs Considered. Additionally, the course compares and contrasts recent releases with some classic albums from the past, including Bob Dylan’s Blood on the Tracks and Joni Mitchell’s Blue.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS WR 150
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Anthropology is a discipline studying human beings from a holistic and cross-cultural perspective; science fiction is a genre exploring facets of human behavior in imaginary settings. Both deal with a combination of the foreign and the familiar, and together anthropology and science fiction offer an ideal opportunity to explore a variety of interesting topics: politics, cross-cultural communication, religion, evolution, socialization, identity, gender, war, government, dreams, and others. Readings include short stories, novels, and essays by authors such as Ursula Le Guin, Octavia Butler, Isaac Asimov, and Chad Oliver.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS WR 152
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Writing, Research, & Inquiry with Digital/Multimedia Expression. Higher education is at a moment of cultural crisis, as stakeholders from parents to politicians question the goals, strategies, and experiences of college. This seminar invites the student, as principal stakeholder, to weigh in on this debate. What is it like to be a college student today? What are the challenges, both visible and hidden? What are the overlooked rewards? This seminar explores questions about the culture of college as reflected through students’ experience at Boston University. Students draw on a range of research methods to investigate aspects of their BU experience, from what they study to what they eat. Texts include scholarly articles by writers such as Peter Arnett, Jean Twenge, and Pierre Bourdieu; contemporary journalism; and primary sources that students produce, including photos and surveys.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS WR 150
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Considering the popular and critical success of works such as The Hunger Games and Handmaid’s Tale, why have dystopian fictions, film, and video games become one of the most celebrated artistic genres of the last decade? What do dystopian worlds have to teach us about the world in which we live today, and to what extent do they serve as warnings about the world to come? This seminar considers how dystopian literature and film both consciously and unconsciously reflect social and cultural anxieties about issues such as bioethics, technological advancement, socioeconomic disparity, and governmental control. We examine underlying assumptions about human nature versus the nature of human institutions and the dystopian genre as a vehicle of social and political critique.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS WR 151
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Writing, Research, & Inquiry with Oral and/or Signed Expression. Great speeches inspire and challenge us. Oratory is, in fact, a central component of democracy and democratic culture. This course studies great speeches live, on the page, and in films. What makes a great speech? Are the great speeches of the past still relevant today? Students explore these and other questions by speaking, writing, and researching about famous speeches, orators, oratorical occasions, and theories of public speaking. Works include speeches by Abraham Lincoln, Franklin Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, and Martin Luther King, as well as film adaptations of great speeches and other fictional orations.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS WR 152
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Writing, Research, & Inquiry with Digital/Multimedia Expression. Despite claims that we live in a “post-racial” time, the idea of race has undeniable consequences for American citizens and institutions alike. This seminar examines the ways in which the lived experiences of Americans of various backgrounds are represented in contemporary literature and media. What do specific representations reveal about race- and ethnicity-based stereotypes? How do specific representations reflect or counter typical narratives about the conditions of life for people of color in America? How do these representations minimize or celebrate the complexities of experience? Students have the opportunity to consider these questions as they undertake their own research on a particular representation of race/ethnicity in America. Texts may include Vanessa Hua’s Deceit and Other Possibilities, Claudia Rankine’s poetry and essays, and Aziz Ansari’s Master of None.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS WR 151
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Writing, Research, & Inquiry with Oral and/or Signed Expression. Why do we adapt books into movies? How does the experience of a story we first encounter as a text change when we see it on screen? Are filmmakers obligated to be “faithful” to their sources, or do they have artistic license to innovate? Is literature an inherently “higher” form of art than movies? This course considers these and other questions about the nature of literature on film and develops students’ skills as critical film readers and as proficient writers and communicators. We analyze the practice of cinematic adaptation by speaking and writing about key examples such as Shakespeare’s Macbeth, August Wilson’s Fences, and J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone. The goal is to produce well-researched, clear, and persuasive communication about the difference that form makes in our encounters with art.

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COURSE: CAS WR 150
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

In this course, students write about marijuana’s polarizing influence in recent American history. Marijuana prohibition in America has evolved to reflect political, social, economic, and scientific trends in twentieth-century US history. This course questions the role of science and morality in drug enforcement policy and evaluates the recent push for decriminalization during three periods: the prohibition years in the first half of the century; the countercultural period after the 1950s and the backlash it created; and the medicinal marijuana era that followed the 1980s. Sources for this course include Martin Lee’s Smoke Signals, Richard Nixon’s presidential recordings, and Dorm Room Dealer: Drugs and the Privileges of Race and Class by Mohamed and Fritsvold, as well as examples of popular culture from Reefer Madness to Cheech and Chong.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS WR 150
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

The memoir is usually viewed as a private genre of personal recollection. Yet many important writers have used the form to explore larger questions of historical, economic, political, and religious significance. This course focuses on writers of memoir who have examined their lives and the lives of their families through lenses wider than the personal. Readings include Nick Flynn’s The Ticking is the Bomb, Kathryn Harrison’s The Kiss, Lauren Slater’s Lying, and Thomas Lynch’s The Undertaking.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS WR 152
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Writing, Research, & Inquiry with Digital/Multimedia Expression. In the sixties and seventies, Vietnam and civil unrest gave birth to a golden age of horror movies. In our new century, we have been forced to confront tragedy and trauma on an even greater scale, from 9/11 to ISIS attacks in Western Europe to threats from the Korean Peninsula. This course examines the horror genre in both film and television as a powerful meditation on the fears and anxieties of a new and uncertain century, including terrorism, chemical and biological warfare, disease pandemic, authoritarianism, and nuclear attack. Examples of horror from America, Europe, and Southeast Asia, including 28 Days Later, Pan’s Labyrinth, and Cloverfield, invite us to consider the problem in a global, cross-cultural context.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS WR 150
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Focusing on critical and scholarly readings of twentieth- and twenty-first-century wordless visual literature intended for children, this course explores not only the ways in which such literature functions as both a visual and literary work of art, but also how the form captures and constructs the experience of being a child. By reading a number of critical works, we also examine the conversations that are taking place about this literary genre’s treatment of innocence, imagination, knowledge, and nostalgia. Readings include works by scholars such as Molly Bang and Jane Doonan.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: MET SO 501
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Special Topics in Sociology. A socio-cultural history of Boston’s North End that examines changes in the area from the first Puritan settlement to the current period of gentrification, with central attention given to the dynamics of culture change among the Italian immigrants. Covers the impact of global changes on local processes, changes in American notions of identity and inclusion, and ethnic succession and competition; religious change, social organization, and Catholic festivals; William Foote Whyte’s “Street Corner Society”; myths and realities of “the Mafia” and impact of urban decline and drug violence in the North End in the 70s and 80s; tourism, food marketing, and gentrification. Course includes two visits to the North End, including dinner in a North End restaurant on the final night of the course.

There is an additional USD $100 fee for this course.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS PS 371
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: (CAS PS 101).

Attention to the wide range of ways in which personality may become disordered, and emphasis on normal behavior development as highlighted by psychopathology. Evidence and theories concerning problems of treatment are also considered.

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COURSE: CAS SO 205
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Examines the family as a historically and geographically contingent social construction. How families in the U.S. are organized. Considers diverse family formations and intersections of race, class, gender, and sexuality in the operation of family dynamics and politics.

Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry I, Critical Thinking.

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COURSE: CAS SO 352 / CAS WS 352
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Considers the biological and social organization of masculinities; the ways culture reproduces/articulates masculinities, particularly with regard to race and class; how masculine identities are expressed; male privilege; alternative masculinities; and what is at stake in negotiating contemporary masculinities.

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COURSE: SED CE 630
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Focuses on the scientific study of psychological aspects of living a fulfilling and flourishing life. Topics include happiness, empathy, optimism, friendship, goal setting, achievement, emotion, creativity, humor, and mindfulness. Students become familiar with theory and research in this relatively new subfield and critically consider applications to their teaching, coaching, leadership, and/or counseling.

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COURSE: CAS PO 300 / CAS WS 304
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Special Topics in American Politics. This course delves into the world of Black Widows and Demon Lovers. Using empirical research, case studies, and drama, the course separates fact from fiction to examine gender and its intersections between recruitment, motivations, and conditions under which women behave violently.

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COURSE: CAS IR 501 / CAS PO 554
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: junior standing or consent of instructor.

Investigates patterns of conflict and cooperation in South and East Asia surrounding issues ranging from water resources and health to borders and war. Analyzes how such issues contribute to instability in the region, as well as methods of cooperation.

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COURSE: CAS PS 241
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS PS 101).

Critical review of research and theories pertaining to intellectual and social development of infants and children. Role of early experiences and biological factors in later formation of personality, and intellectual and motivational behaviors; includes theories of Erikson, Piaget, and Freud.

Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry I, Critical Thinking.

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COURSE: CAS IR 330
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

This course is designed to familiarize students with the “art of the possible,” emphasizing the evolution of diplomatic practice. Students will be able to understand how foreign policy is formulated and promulgated and how diplomacy works on a daily basis. The course explores the role and importance of multilateral diplomacy/international organizations (liberalism) in today’s world and examines how multilateral diplomacy functions. Students will grasp the core principles of diplomatic negotiations and demonstrate them in simulations.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy, Research and Information Literacy, Teamwork/Collaboration.

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COURSE: CAS PO 390
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Special Topics in Political Theory. In this political theory course, we examine dilemmas surrounding domination and liberation in political theory and practice. We ask what liberation is, how diverse forms of domination obstruct it; and whether freedom can be sustained in a lasting way.

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COURSE: CAS PS 333
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: (CAS PS 101) and (CAS PS 231 or CAS NE 101) and PS junior or senior standing; or consent of instructor.

Comprehensive survey of drug influences on behavior; introduces a neuroscience approach to behavior. Several classes of drugs are discussed, including abused and addictive substances and psychoactive and therapeutic agents.

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COURSE: CAS PS 325
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: ((CAS PS 211 or (CAS MA 115 & CAS MA 116)) and (CAS PS 251 or CAS PS 252)).

Systematic approaches to the study of personality. Experimental and observational investigations of selected aspects of personality. Demonstration of experimental procedures and student participation in laboratory and field studies.

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COURSE: CAS PO 330
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Special Topics in Comparative Politics. Introduces students to key theories explaining the rise of extremism in democracies, including economic marginalization, the democratic deficit, and ethnic competition and gives students the tools to evaluate contemporary political events through the lens of these (and other) theories.

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COURSE: CAS IR 230
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Introduction to basic concepts of international politics: the state system and types of states, modern ideologies, legal frameworks of international transactions, and political regions. Also raises key issues such as population, the environment, war, and international law.

Carries social science divisional credit in CAS.

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COURSE: CAS WS 302 / CAS SO 390
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Topics in Sociology. Examines social forces shaping gender discrepancies in crime. Using a feminist lens, students explore how cultural ideologies about masculinity and femininity shape criminalization, victimization, and offending. Topics include the gendered contexts of crime and punishment, gender-based violence, and intimate labor.

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COURSE: SAR HS 400 / CAS WS 400
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS WR 120) or equivalent.

This course focuses on strengthening students’ knowledge, skills, and ability to construct a critical appraisal of all the determinants, distribution, causes, mechanisms, systems, and consequences of health inequities related to gender. Emphasis is placed on the historical perspective of women as both recipients and providers of health care, including an exploration of psychological, physiological, social, and political barriers to women’s health and professional life as healthcare providers. The course provides both theoretical and topical coverage of gender and its influence on healthcare, both at the system and individual level. It explores how gender influences and is influenced by healthcare systems through an exploration of some of the major historical, social, and scientific developments that have determined contemporary issues.

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COURSE: CAS PS 101
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Basic introduction to the field of psychology. Topics include theories and findings governing learning, memory, perception, development, personality, and social and abnormal psychology.

Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry I, Ethical Reasoning, Critical Thinking.

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COURSE: CAS HI 287
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Analysis of the history of American foreign policy from the perspective of the changing world and regional international systems; emphasis on the effect of these systems and the impact of America on the creation and operation of international systems.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, Social Inquiry II.

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COURSE: CAS IR 350
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

What are the causes and consequences of the global Cold War? How was the twentieth-century international system transformed by East-West conflict, North-South disparity and South-South cooperation and competition? What lessons can be drawn from this recent past? These are some of the questions examined by this course. The course contextualizes present-day international and regional conflicts and cooperation in the recent past, collectively analyzes primary source documents, and discusses policy implications.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy, Research and Information Literacy.

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COURSE: CAS IR 349
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

What were the causes and the consequences of the two World Wars? What was the nature of political, economic, and military relations among the major powers of the world from the beginning of the twentieth century to the end of the Second World War? What was the effect of domestic factors (political, economic, religious, and ideological) on the foreign policies of individual states? Seeking to provide a genuinely multinational perspective on world affairs, this course assesses the ways in which powerful nation-states in this period competed and cooperated in the international system.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy, Research and Information Literacy.

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COURSE: CAS AN 102
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Introduces basic principles of evolutionary biology, human origins, genetics, reproduction, socio-ecology, and the evolution of primate and human behavior and adaptions. Laboratory sections include examination of fossil and skeletal material, and hands-on projects involving human and primate behavior and biology.

Carries natural science divisional credit (with lab) in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Scientific Inquiry I, Social Inquiry I, Critical Thinking.

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COURSE: CAS PO 329 / CAS IR 390
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Emphasizes the dynamic interaction between politics and economics to understand and explain historical and contemporary issues in international political economy, including international monetary, trade, investment, financial, and environmental relations. Considers emerging challenges and structures in the international political economy.

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COURSE: CAS PS 473
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS PS 371) and PS junior or senior standing.

Introduction to current diagnostic and treatment techniques in clinical psychology from empirical, applied, and theoretical perspectives. Topics covered include clinical interviewing, psychological testing, and a comparison of humanistic, analytic, and systems approaches to therapy.

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COURSE: SED CE 500
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Emphasizes understanding of the theoretical basis of counseling. Introduces learning skills involved in helping relationships. Selected readings in counseling theory and practice are assigned. As part of the skill-building process, opportunities are provided for in-class practice and demonstrations.

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COURSE: CAS AN 101
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

An introduction to the basic concepts, principles, and problems of cultural anthropology, emphasizing the study of both traditional and complex societies. Special attention to the organization and meaning of religion, economic life, kinship and political order; and the problem of cultural variation in the contemporary world.

Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry I, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy, Research and Information Literacy.

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COURSE: CAS PS 211
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS PS 101).

Introduction to the logic and processes involved in descriptive and inferential statistics for psychology. Topics include statistical inference, significance, t-tests, ANOVAs, correlation, and statistical software analysis. This is a hybrid class: class time is reserved for hands on activities.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Scientific Inquiry II, Quantitative Reasoning I.

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COURSE: CAS PO 171 / CAS IR 271
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Explores major issues in international relations, including conflict, cooperation, and governance. Addresses dominant international relations theories and their application. Investigates state system, international law and organization, transnational actors, state behavior, and globalization.

Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry I, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy.

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COURSE: CAS PO 320
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Special Topics in American Politics. Investigates the judiciary’s role in the policy making process. Compares the courts with other political institutions and explores how they differ in their policy-making role. The objective is to develop an understanding of the courts as political actors.

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COURSE: MET CJ 510
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Special Topics in Criminal Justice. Starting in the 1980s, America experienced an unprecedented increase in the use of incarceration as a form of punishment. Although criminal justice reform movements and policy changes have recently slowed the growth in America’s prison population, America’s incarceration rate remains among the highest in the world. This course investigates the social, political, and historical roots of the mass incarceration “experiment,” and examines the consequences it has had and continues to have on individuals, families, communities, governments, and society. The course also focuses on the implications that mass incarceration has on the operation, management, and leadership of correctional agencies. Students will assess and debate public policy options for further reform. Class discussions include specialized experts from a variety of perspectives and evaluation of prominent readings that have taken stock of America’s experience with mass incarceration over the past several decades.

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COURSE: CAS AN 210
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

This lecture and discussion-driven course uses ethnographic case materials and active learning strategies to introduce students to socio-cultural anthropological modes of understanding and analyzing health-related experiences and institutions, including political and ethical dimensions of illness and suffering around the globe.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry II, Ethical Reasoning, Research and Information Literacy.

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COURSE: CAS LJ 283
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

In English translation. Japanese film from the silent era to contemporary animation, with attention to the intersection of cinematic and cultural analysis and genres such as yakuza movies. Directors studied may include Ozu, Kurosawa, Mizoguchi, and Miyazaki Hayao.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy.

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COURSE: SED CE 741
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

A historical, philosophical, and clinical examination of subcultural considerations in counseling psychology professional practice and inquiry.

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COURSE: CAS PS 338
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS PS 231 or CAS BI 325).

Survey of theoretical aspects and major empirical findings in human neuropsychology, including memory, language, spatial function, attention, emotion, and abstract thought. Emphasis is on the relation between brain disorders (resulting from head injury, stroke, degenerative disease, etc.) and abnormal behavior.

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COURSE: CAS PO 328 / CAS IR 395
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Employs a multidisciplinary approach to analyze the relations between the industrialized nations of the “North” and the developing nations of the “South.” Addresses historical and current issues in North-South relations, including trade, investment, migration, regional economic integration, and the environment.

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COURSE: CAS IR 527 / CAS PO 548
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: junior standing or consent of instructor.

How did China implement economic reform? What were the progresses and limitations? How is China’s political-economic development influencing the global system? Discussions are conducted in a comparative perspective. Countries of reference include Japan and India.

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COURSE: CAS PH 155
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

What is justice? What are the foundations of property rights, liberty, and equality? Are anarchism and utopianism defensible? This course is an introduction to major themes and questions in political philosophy. It includes a study of classical and modern texts, as well as contemporary political issues.

Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Philosophical Inquiry and Life’s Meanings, Ethical Reasoning, Critical Thinking.

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COURSE: CAS SO 100
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

An introduction to the major theories and basic principles of sociological analysis. Explores culture, media, socialization, race and ethnicity, globalization, capitalism, gender and sexuality, inequality and poverty, power in American society, and health and medicine from a sociological perspective.

Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry I, Individual in Community, Critical Thinking.

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COURSE: CAS PS 234
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS PS 101).

How do we learn to associate stimuli together? How do we learn to associate behaviors with their consequences? How is memory applicable to learning? What are the different memory processes and systems responsible for learning? The aim of this course is to review the major traditional and current theories of learning and memory. Students begin with an understanding of simple learning, including theories and basic principles of classical and operant conditioning. Students then are introduced to the memory system, the three stages of memory, implicit and explicit memory processes.

Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Scientific Inquiry I, Social Inquiry I, Critical Thinking.

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COURSE: CAS PS 251
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS PS 101).

Emphasizes the historical development of personality theories and their application to social and clinical concerns. Classic theories of personality (e.g., psychoanalytical, behavioral, trait, humanistic, cognitive, and social roles) are explored and evaluated through lectures, readings, and case materials. A consideration of trait-based approaches and personality disorder with regards to DSM 5 criteria is also included.

Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, Social Inquiry I, Critical Thinking.

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COURSE: MET UA 510
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Special Topics in Urban Affairs. Since the mid-1800s, scientists and researchers have continuously shown how public policies significantly impact the health of individuals now and in the future. Through readings, case studies, guest lectures, and in-class exercises, students learn about the lasting impacts of many of these policies. Students are also introduced to a variety of strategies used to design interventions that target urban problems and to the role of evidence in the policymaking process. This course is well suited for curious students with an introductory background in planning, public health, and related fields.

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COURSE: CAS PO 300
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Special Topics in American Politics. How do Americans think about race and how does attitude influence political preferences? Students first look into traditional understandings of race and public opinion and then examine recent developments promising to change the role of racial attitudes in American Politics.

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COURSE: CAS IR 337 / CAS PO 379 / CAS RN 379
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Introduction to the comparative study of the political role of religious institutions and beliefs. Covers issues such as religion’s relationship to violence and terrorism, democracy and human rights, group identity, gender and sexuality, and modernity and secularism.

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COURSE: CAS LC 287
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Major Chinese films interpreted in light of modern Chinese history and culture. Focuses on questions of national and cultural identity in films from the 1980s to the present day by directors from Mainland China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong. In English.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy.

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COURSE: CAS AN 260
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Cross-cultural examination of changing gender roles, expectations, and activities. Focuses on economic, social, political, and ideological determinants that structure the hierarchy of power and privileges accorded the thoughts, activities, and experiences of women and men in various societies.

Counts towards the Women’s, Gender, & Sexuality Studies minor. Carries social science divisional credit in CAS.

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COURSE: CAS SO 240
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Introduction to sociological perspectives on sexuality. Historical and comparative analysis of sexuality, with a focus on the social and cultural institutions that shape sexuality in the contemporary U.S.

Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry I, Critical Thinking.

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COURSE: CAS PS 261
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS PS 101).

Provides an understanding of how behavior, feelings, and thoughts of individuals are influenced and determined by characteristics of a situation. Topics include attraction, attitudes, prejudice, social rules, aggression, person perception, and groups. Readings cover theories, experimental research, and application.

Carries social science divisional credit in CAS.

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COURSE: CAS SO 215
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Social, cultural, and intercultural factors in health and illness. Training and socialization of medical professionals, roots of medical power and authority, organization and operation of health care facilities. U.S. health care system and its main problems. Comparison of health care systems in the U.S. and in other countries.

Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry I, Ethical Reasoning.

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COURSE: CAS AA 207 / CAS SO 207
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Social definition of race and ethnicity. The adjustment of different ethnic groups and their impact upon U.S. social life. How prejudice and discrimination create class identities and how caste relations have affected patterns of integration during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Carries social science divisional credit in CAS.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS AA 335 / CAS SO 335 / CAS WS 335
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: at least one prior 100- or 200-level sociology course, CAS WS 101/102, or consent of the instructor.

Examines race, class, gender, and sexuality as intersecting axes of stratification, identity, and experience. Draws heavily from feminist theories in both sociology and history in order to analyze how these intersections can be applied to understanding social problems and structures.

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COURSE: SED CE 769
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

A comprehensive overview of the field of substance use and abuse, as well as prevention practices and intervention models. Students learn about substance use within the context of normative development as well as addictive behaviors and their associated interventions

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COURSE: CAS AN 263
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

An exploration of female behavioral biology focusing on evolutionary, physiological, and biosocial aspects of women’s lives from puberty through pregnancy, birth, lactation, menopause, and aging. Examples are drawn from traditional and industrialized societies, and data from nonhuman primates are considered.

Counts for Natural Science credit; as a Biology – Specialization in Behavioral Biology – elective; and towards the Women’s, Gender, & Sexuality Studies minor. Carries natural science divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Scientific Inquiry I, Social Inquiry I, Critical Thinking.

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COURSE: CAS IR 511
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

A critical survey of the rise and development of modern nations, states, and economies in the Middle East and North Africa since 1900 that provides context and perspective essential for understanding contemporary issues (e.g., peace process, gender relations, religion’s roles, democracy).

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COURSE: SED CE 847
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

A conceptual and experiential introduction to group dynamics. Participation in an ongoing training group while studying the dynamics of group development. Covers group counseling approaches and models, issues of small group leadership, and styles of leadership. Treatment of group counseling goals, composition, phases, and research.

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COURSE: CAS IR 300 / CAS PO 380
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Topics in International Relations. This course studies the evolution and current status of the women’s movement throughout select African countries on issues such as politics and media culture. Its goal is to provide a broad understanding of women’s lives in the region, both in relation to and separate from globalization.

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COURSE: CAS WR 150
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Anthropology is a discipline studying human beings from a holistic and cross-cultural perspective; science fiction is a genre exploring facets of human behavior in imaginary settings. Both deal with a combination of the foreign and the familiar, and together anthropology and science fiction offer an ideal opportunity to explore a variety of interesting topics: politics, cross-cultural communication, religion, evolution, socialization, identity, gender, war, government, dreams, and others. Readings include short stories, novels, and essays by authors such as Ursula Le Guin, Octavia Butler, Isaac Asimov, and Chad Oliver.

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COURSE: CAS WR 152
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Writing, Research, & Inquiry with Digital/Multimedia Expression. Despite claims that we live in a “post-racial” time, the idea of race has undeniable consequences for American citizens and institutions alike. This seminar examines the ways in which the lived experiences of Americans of various backgrounds are represented in contemporary literature and media. What do specific representations reveal about race- and ethnicity-based stereotypes? How do specific representations reflect or counter typical narratives about the conditions of life for people of color in America? How do these representations minimize or celebrate the complexities of experience? Students have the opportunity to consider these questions as they undertake their own research on a particular representation of race/ethnicity in America. Texts may include Vanessa Hua’s Deceit and Other Possibilities, Claudia Rankine’s poetry and essays, and Aziz Ansari’s Master of None.

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COURSE: CAS WR 150
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

In this course, students write about marijuana’s polarizing influence in recent American history. Marijuana prohibition in America has evolved to reflect political, social, economic, and scientific trends in twentieth-century US history. This course questions the role of science and morality in drug enforcement policy and evaluates the recent push for decriminalization during three periods: the prohibition years in the first half of the century; the countercultural period after the 1950s and the backlash it created; and the medicinal marijuana era that followed the 1980s. Sources for this course include Martin Lee’s Smoke Signals, Richard Nixon’s presidential recordings, and Dorm Room Dealer: Drugs and the Privileges of Race and Class by Mohamed and Fritsvold, as well as examples of popular culture from Reefer Madness to Cheech and Chong.

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COURSE: CAS MA 411
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: ((CAS MA 225 or CAS MA 230) & (CAS MA 242 or CAS MA 442)).

Extends concepts and techniques of calculus and develops further applications. Topics include higher dimensional calculus, applications of vector analysis, uniform convergence of series, complex series, improper integrals, gamma and beta functions, Stirling’s formula, Fourier series and transform.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: QST IS 467
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (QST IS 223). Junior standing.

Designed to provide students with an overview of Agile Development methodologies. Introduces the various methods currently used in the industry and then focuses on the primary methodologies used today, SCRUM and Kanban. Students learn the tools of these software development approaches that produce deliverables to end users every two to four weeks, and analyze the value each of these methodologies brings into the development process and the reasoning behind a corporation selecting one method over the other (or a combination of both). In addition, students are introduced to CA Project Management software, the leader in the industry for SCRUM. Students learn to analyze requirements, create backlogs, schedule “stories” to be developed, hold Standup meetings, Reviews and Retrospectives.

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COURSE: CAS CS 565
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS CS 112 & CAS CS 330) and familiarity with linear algebra, probability, and statistics.

Introduction to data mining concepts and techniques. Topics include association and correlation discovery, classification and clustering of large datasets, outlier detection. Emphasis on the algorithmic aspects as well as the application of mining in real-world problems.

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COURSE: CAS MA 416
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS MA 116 or CAS MA 214) or equivalent.

Fundamental concepts and analytical skills in analysis of variance, including crossed and nested designs, as well as fixed- and random- effect models. Trend analysis for repeated measures, expected mean squares, and non- parametric techniques. SAS is used throughout the course.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS BI 407
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS BI 107).

Ethological approach to animal behavior; physiological, ontogenic, and phylogenic causes; and adaptive significance of behavior examined within an evolutionary framework, minimally including humans. Students must register for two sections: lecture and laboratory.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS CS 591
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS CS 112) or consent of instructor.

Topics in Computer Science. Introduction to application creation, written in Javascript, using the MEAN stack as examined from theoretical and practical perspectives. Culminating in a final session-long programming project.

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COURSE: CAS MA 294
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS MA 293) or consent of instructor.

Abstract algebra and its applications to combinatorics. A first exposure to groups, rings, and fields via significant combinatorial applications.

Students who have already received credit for MA 541 or MA 542 may not subsequently receive credit for MA 294.

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COURSE: CAS MA 119
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Applications of mathematics for personal financial decision-making. Systems of equations, exponential functions, logarithms, probability, descriptive statistics, and numerical simulation, for modeling saving, borrowing, inflation, purchasing power, taxation, government benefits, risk management, insurance, annuities, and investments.

Carries MCS divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry I, Quantitative Reasoning I. This course also fulfills the learning outcomes for Life Skills.

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COURSE: CAS MA 214
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: (CAS MA 213) or consent of instructor.

Inference about proportions, goodness of fit, student’s t-distribution, tests for normality; two-sample comparisons, regression and correlation, tests for linearity and outliers, residual analysis, contingency tables, analysis of variance.

Students may receive credit for not more than one of the following courses: CAS MA 116, MA 214, or MA 614. Carries MCS divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Quantitative Reasoning II, Teamwork/Collaboration.

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COURSE: CAS MA 213
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: good background in high school algebra.

Elementary treatment of probability densities, means, variances, correlation, independence, the central limit theorem, confidence intervals, and p-values. Stresses understanding and theoretical manipulation of statistical concepts.

Students may receive credit for not more than one of the following courses: CAS MA 113, MA 115, or MA 213. Carries MCS divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Quantitative Reasoning II, Teamwork/Collaboration.

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COURSE: CAS CH 421 / CAS BI 421
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS CH 204 or CAS CH 212 or CAS CH 214) or equivalent.

Introductory biochemistry. Protein structure and folding, enzyme mechanisms, kinetics, and allostery; nucleic acid structure; macromolecular biosynthesis with emphasis on specificity and fidelity; lipids and membrane structure; vitamins and coenzymes; introduction to intermediary metabolism. Students must register for three sections: lecture, discussion, and laboratory.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS CH 423
CREDITS: 3 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS CH 204 or CAS CH 212 or CAS CH 214) or equivalent.

Introductory biochemistry. Protein structure and folding, enzyme mechanisms, kinetics, and allostery; nucleic acid structure; macromolecular biosynthesis with emphasis on specificity and fidelity; lipids and membrane structure; vitamins and coenzymes; introduction to intermediary metabolism.

Not acceptable for credit toward the chemistry major or minor. For students who do not require laboratory credit.

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COURSE: CAS BI 107
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

For students who plan to major in the natural sciences or environmental science, and for premedical students. Required for biology majors. No prerequisite. High school biology is assumed. The evolution and diversity of life; principles of ecology; behavioral biology. Students must register for two sections: lecture and laboratory.

Carries natural science divisional credit (with lab) in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Scientific Inquiry I, Quantitative Reasoning I, Critical Thinking, Research and Information Literacy.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS BI 108
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

For students planning to major in the natural sciences and for premedical students. Required for biology majors. It is strongly recommended students complete CAS CH 101 (or equivalent) before this course. High school biology is assumed. Cell and molecular biology, Mendelian & molecular genetics, physiology, and neurobiology. Students must register for two sections: lecture and laboratory.

Carries natural science divisional credit (with lab) in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Scientific Inquiry II, Quantitative Reasoning II, Critical Thinking, Teamwork/Collaboration.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS BI 525 / CAS NE 525
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS NE 102 or CAS BI 203) and (CAS NE 203 or CAS BI 325).

An in- depth look at molecular mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases and their impact and relevance in clinical diagnosis and treatment. Topics include the molecular pathways of Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, and Creutzfeldt- Jacob Disease, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. Students must attend both lecture and discussion.

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COURSE: CAS BI 551
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS BI 203 or CAS BI 206) , or consent of instructor.

Views on stem cell research range from assumptions of a potential cure for most diseases to fears that it will depreciate the value of human life. This course equips students with the science that underlies this discussion, including the biological properties of stem cells and the experimental hurdles to utilization in regenerative medicine. Students must attend both lecture and discussion.

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COURSE: CAS MA 123
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Limits; derivatives; differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions. Applications to maxima, minima, and convexity of functions. The definite integral; the fundamental theorem of integral calculus.

Students may receive credit for either CAS MA 121 or 123, but not both. Carries MCS divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Quantitative Reasoning II.

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COURSE: CAS MA 124
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: (CAS MA 121 or CAS MA 123).

Logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric functions. Sequences and series; Taylor’s series with the remainder. Methods of integration. Calculus I and II together constitute an introduction to calculus of a function of a single real variable.

Students may receive credit for not more than one of the following courses: CAS MA 122, MA 124, MA 127, or MA 129. Carries MCS divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Quantitative Reasoning II.

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COURSE: CAS MA 121
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Differentiation and integration of functions of one variable. Same topics as CAS MA 123, but with less emphasis on mathematical generality and more on applications. Especially suitable for students concentrating in the biological and social sciences.

Students may receive credit for either CAS MA 121 or 123, but not both. Carries MCS divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Quantitative Reasoning II.

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COURSE: CAS MA 122
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS MA 121 or CAS MA 123). Continuation of CAS MA 121.

Review of univariate calculus, calculus of the elementary transcendental functions, elementary differential equations, elementary multivariate calculus. Applications to exponential growth, optimization, equilibrium, and dynamic modeling problems.

Students may receive credit for not more than one of the following courses: CAS MA 122, MA 124, MA 127, or MA 129. Carries MCS divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Quantitative Reasoning II.

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COURSE: CAS BI 203
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS BI 108 & CAS CH 102) or equivalent. Coreq: (CAS CH 203) or equivalent.

Principles of cellular organization and function: biological molecules, flow of genetic information, membranes and subcellular organelles, and cell regulation. Students must attend both lecture and discussion.

Students may receive credit for CAS BI 203 or 213, but not both.

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COURSE: CAS CS 131
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Representation, analysis, techniques, and principles for manipulation of basic combinatoric structures used in computer science. Rigorous reasoning is emphasized.

This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Quantitative Reasoning II.

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COURSE: CAS MA 412
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS MA 225 or CAS MA 230).

Basic concepts, results, and applications of complex analysis. Emphasis on computation and applications. Complex plane and functions, differentiability, Cauchy-Riemann conditions, contour integrals, Cauchy formulas, complex series, residue calculus, applications. Extends the concepts of the calculus to the complex setting.

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COURSE: CAS CS 210
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS CS 112).

Fundamental concepts of computer systems and systems programming. Hardware fundamentals including digital logic, memory systems, processor design, buses, I/O subsystems, data representations, computer arithmetic, and instruction-set architecture. Software concepts including assembly language programming, operating systems, assemblers, linkers, and systems programming in C. Students must register for two sections: lecture and discussion.

This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Quantitative Reasoning II.

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COURSE: MET CS 101
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

For students with no previous experience with computers. Organization and function of computer systems; application of computers in today’s society; social impact of computers. Introduction to algorithms, various types of application packages, and the Internet. Not for computer science majors.

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COURSE: CAS CS 320
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS CS 131 and CAS CS 210).

Concepts involved in the design of programming languages. Bindings, argument transmission, and control structures. Environments: compile-time, load-time, and run-time. Interpreters.

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COURSE: CAS ES 105
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

After covering the origin of the universe, earth, and life, the course examines two topics: natural hazards, including earthquakes and volcanoes; and human impacts on Earth, including climate change, ozone depletion, pollution, and increasing demands on mineral and energy resources.

Carries natural science divisional credit (with lab) in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Scientific Inquiry I, Quantitative Reasoning I, Research and Information Literacy.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: MET CS 555
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (MET CS 544), equivalent knowledge, or instructor’s consent.

Provides an overview of the statistical tools most commonly used to process, analyze, and visualize data. Topics include simple linear regression, multiple regression, logistic regression, analysis of variance, and survival analysis. These topics are explored using the statistical package R, with a focus on understanding how to use and interpret output from this software as well as how to visualize results. In each topic area, the methodology, including underlying assumptions and the mechanics of how it all works along with appropriate interpretation of the results, are discussed. Concepts are presented in context of real world examples.

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COURSE: MET CS 342
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (MET CS 232) or instructor’s consent.

Covers data structures using the Java programming language. Topics include data abstraction, encapsulation, information hiding, and the use of recursion, creation, and manipulation of various data structures: lists, queues, tables, trees, heaps, and graphs, and searching and sorting algorithms.

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COURSE: CAS BI 410
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS BI 203) or equivalent, or consent of instructor.

Contemporary aspects of embryonic development, drawing from current literature. Emphasis on the use of experimental approaches to address topics such as polarity in the egg, body axis specification, embryonic patterning, and organogenesis. Students must attend both lecture and discussion.

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COURSE: CAS MA 226
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: (CAS MA 225 or CAS MA 230).

First-order linear and separable equations. Second-order equations and first- order systems. Linear equations and linearization. Numerical and qualitative analysis. Laplace transforms. Applications and modeling of real phenomena throughout.

Cannot be taken for credit in addition to CAS MA 231.

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COURSE: MET CS 248
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Fundamentals of logic (the laws of logic, rules of inferences, quantifiers, proofs of theorems). Fundamental principles of counting (permutations, combinations), set theory, relations and functions, graphs, trees and sorting.

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COURSE: CAS MA 293
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: (CAS MA 123).

Propositional logic, set theory. Elementary probability theory. Number theory. Combinatorics with applications.

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COURSE: ENG EK 307
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Coreq: (CAS PY 212).

Introduction to electric circuit analysis and design; voltage, current, and power, circuit laws and theorems; element I-V curves, linear and nonlinear circuit concepts; operational amplifier circuits; transient response of capacitor and inductor circuits, sinusoidal steady-state response, frequency response, transfer functions. Includes design-oriented laboratory. Students must register for two sections: lecture and a laboratory.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: ENG EC 455
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS PY 212 & CAS MA 226).

Time varying electric and magnetic fields. Maxwell equations. Electromagnetic waves. Propagation, reflection, and transmission. Remote sensing applications. Radio frequency coaxial cables, microwave waveguides, and optical fibers. Microwave sources and resonators. Antennas and radiation. Radio links, radar, and wireless communication systems. Electromagnetic effects in high-speed digital systems.

ENG EC 455 and ENG EC 456 may be taken at the same time. Includes discussion.

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COURSE: ENG EC 456
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS PY 212 & CAS MA 226).

Electric field, energy, and force. Lorenz force. Dielectric materials. Steady electric currents. Magnetic field, energy, and force. Magnetic materials. Applications of electrostatics, magnetostatics, and electrodynamics. Electromagnetic waves in dielectric and conducting materials. Solution techniques for electromagnetic fields and waves.

ENG EC 455 and ENG EC 456 may be taken at the same time. Includes discussion.

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COURSE: CAS PY 105
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

The CAS PY 105/106 sequence satisfies premedical requirements. PY105 covers some of the basic principles underlying the physics of everyday life, including forces and motion, momentum and energy, harmonic motion, rotation, and heat and thermodynamics. Students must register for two sections: lecture and a laboratory.

Carries natural science divisional credit (with lab) in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Scientific Inquiry I, Quantitative Reasoning I, Critical Thinking.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS PY 106
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: (CAS PY 105) or equivalent.

The CAS PY 105/106 sequence satisfies premedical requirements. PY106 covers some of the basic principles underlying the physics of everyday life, including electricity and magnetism, direct-current circuits, waves, optics, and modern physics. Students must register for two sections: lecture and a laboratory.

Carries natural science divisional credit (with lab) in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Scientific Inquiry II, Quantitative Reasoning II, Critical Thinking.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS MA 113
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Basic concepts of estimation and tests of hypotheses, ideas from probability; one-, two-, and multiple-sample problems. Applications are in the social sciences and students will be able to understand the basics of using a sample to predict uncertainty.

Primarily for students in the social sciences who require a one-semester introduction to statistics; others should consider CAS MA 115 or MA 213. MA 113 may not be taken for credit by any student who has completed any MA course numbered 300 or higher. Students may receive credit for not more than one of the following courses: CAS MA 113, MA 115, or MA 213. Carries MCS divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Quantitative Reasoning II.

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COURSE: CAS GE 100
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Introduces natural and social science concepts that underlie global environmental change and sustainability. Topics include climate change, biodiversity, energy, water, pollution, deforestation, agriculture, population growth. Sustainable development illustrated with ecological footprint based on student’s lifestyle.

Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry I, Ethical Reasoning.

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COURSE: CAS BI 309
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS BI 107 & CAS BI 108) or equivalent.

Introduction to modern concepts, controversies, and analytical approaches in evolutionary biology. Topics include adaptation, natural and sexual selection, species and speciation, phylogenetics, comparative analysis, basic population and quantitative genetics, origin of novelty, adaptive radiation, development and evolution. Students must attend both lecture and discussion.

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COURSE: MET CS 544
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (MET CS546 and (MET CS520 or MET CS521)) or equivalent knowledge, or instructor’s consent.

Provides students with the mathematical and practical background required in the field of data analytics. Starting with an introduction to probability and statistics, the R tool is introduced for statistical computing and graphics. Different types of data are investigated along with data summarization techniques and plotting. Data populations using discrete, continuous, and multivariate distributions are explored. Errors during measurements and computations are analyzed in the course. Confidence intervals and hypothesis testing topics are also examined. The concepts covered in the course are demonstrated using R. Laboratory Course.

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COURSE: CAS BI 383
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS BI 281 & CAS BI 282) and enrollment in Seven-Year Liberal Arts/Medical Education Program.

An introduction to physiological principles applied across the levels of organization (cell, tissue, organ systems). Intended to prepare the student for more advanced courses in physiology. Topics include homeostasis and neural, muscle, cardiopulmonary, renal, endocrine, metabolic, and reproductive physiology. Students must register for two sections: lecture and laboratory.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS CH 101
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: two years of high school algebra.

For science majors and minors who require a two-semester general chemistry course. Topics include atoms and molecules; molecular connectivity, infrared spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry; stoichiometry and introduction to reactions in aqueous solutions; thermochemistry and the first law of thermodynamics; quantum aspects of light and matter; and bonding in diatomic and polyatomic molecules. Laboratory exercises include the size of an atom, qualitative analysis, thermochemistry, and quantum aspects of light and matter. Students must register for three sections: lecture, discussion, and laboratory.

Carries natural science divisional credit (with lab) in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Scientific Inquiry I, Quantitative Reasoning I.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS CH 102
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: (CAS CH 101).

For science majors and minors who require a two-semester general chemistry course. Topics include properties of gases; solutions and solubility; equilibrium; acids, bases, and buffers; electrochemistry; spontaneity, free energy and the second law of thermodynamics; and chemical kinetics.

Students must have completed CAS CH 101 prior to enrolling in CAS CH 102. Students must register for three sections: lecture, discussion, and laboratory. Carries natural science divisional credit (with lab) in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Scientific Inquiry I, Quantitative Reasoning I.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS CH 131
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Coreq: (CAS MA 123).

A one-semester, terminal general chemistry course for students who do not require a two-semester sequence. Lecture topics include stoichiometry; atomic and molecular structure; theories of bonding; chemistry of the solid, liquid, and gaseous states; properties of solutions; chemical thermodynamics; equilibrium; acids and bases; electrochemistry. Laboratory includes training in basic laboratory techniques such as data collection and recording, statistical interpretation of data, solution preparation, titrations, conducting chemical reactions, use of spectrophotometers, pH and voltmeters.

Carries natural science divisional credit (with lab) in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Scientific Inquiry I, Quantitative Reasoning I.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS BI 311
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS BI 203 & CAS BI 206) or consent of instructor.

Biology of bacteria and related microorganisms; morphology, physiology, genetics, ecology, and control. Brief introduction to pathogenicity and host reactions. Students must register for two sections: lecture and a laboratory.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS PY 211
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS MA 123) or consent of instructor for students concurrently taking CAS MA 123. Coreq: (CAS MA 124 or CAS MA 127).

Calculus-based introduction to basic principles of physics, emphasizing Newtonian mechanics, conservation laws, and thermodynamics. For science majors and engineers, and for premedical students who seek a more analytical course than CAS PY 105/106. Interactive, student-centered lectures and laboratory. Students must register for two sections: lecture and a laboratory.

Carries natural science divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Scientific Inquiry I, Quantitative Reasoning I, Critical Thinking, Teamwork/Collaboration.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS PY 212
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS PY 211 & CAS MA 124) or consent of instructor for students concurrently taking CAS MA 123 or CAS MA 225.

Calculus-based introduction to basic principles of physics, emphasizing electromagnetism, circuits, and optics. For science majors and engineers, and for premedical students who seek a more analytical course than CAS PY 105/106. Interactive, student- centered lectures and laboratory. Students must register for two sections: lecture and a laboratory.

Carries natural science divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Scientific Inquiry II, Quantitative Reasoning II, Critical Thinking, Teamwork/Collaboration.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS BI 206
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS BI 108 & CAS CH 203) or equivalent.

Principles of classical, molecular, and evolutionary genetics derived from analytical, molecular, and whole genome cytological evidence in animals, plants, and microorganisms.

Students must attend both lecture and discussion. Students may receive credit for CAS BI 206 or 216, but not both.

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COURSE: CAS CS 132
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS CS 111; CAS MA 123 recommended).

Basic concepts, data structures, and algorithms for geometric objects. Examples of topics: Cartesian geometry, transformations and their representation, queries and sampling, triangulations. Emphasis on rigorous reasoning and analysis, advancing algorithmic maturity and expertise in its application.

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COURSE: CAS MA 549
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: consent of instructor.

Problem-oriented seminar in modern geometry focusing on invariants of transformation groups. Specific topics may include Euclidean and plane geometry, Hilbert’s Axioms, conics, tilings, finite, projective, spherical and/or hyperbolic geometry, tessellations, applications to number theory, Platonic Solids.

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COURSE: MET UA 510
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Special Topics in Urban Affairs. Provides a framework for understanding the global network of cities and how particular cities occupy niches within that network. The course uses Boston and Massachusetts “Gateway Cities” to explore the long-term forces shaping global economic activity and urban development, including transportation, telecommunications, international trade, immigration, innovation, higher education, and cultural exchange. The United Nations Habitat III Conference and other international urban organizations are used to examine strategies for sustainable urban development in cities around the world.

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COURSE: CAS CS 591
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS CS 112) or consent of instructor.

Topics in Computer Science. This course investigates new tools and mathematics that aid in understanding real-world graphs. The course begins with a quick review of basic graph theory (various definitions, some key concepts, theorems, and algorithms). It then introduces some more advanced concepts such as random graph theory and spectral graph theory. Using such tools, students investigate various models and concepts that attempt to describe real-world networks – scale-free networks, preferential attachment, sparse and inhomogenous models, etc. We also discuss some key recent results such as Szeremedi’s regularity lemma. The course also studies some past and future applications of these concepts that are relevant to students’ current interests. At least the half of the grade will be based on term projects to be done in small groups.

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COURSE: SAR HS 581
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: ((CAS BI 105 & CAS BI 106) or (CAS BI 107 & CAS BI 108)) and (CAS BI 211 or CAS BI 315).

Regional approach to the musculoskeletal, peripheral nervous, and circulatory systems of the human body. Laboratories reinforce the lectures by a study of osteology, prosected cadavers, and live anatomy palpations. Students must register for two sections: lecture and a laboratory.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS BI 210
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS BI 105) or equivalent.

Intensive preprofessional course for students whose programs require anatomy. Not for biology major or minor credit. Gross structure of the human body; skeletal, muscular, nervous, respiratory, circulatory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Students must register for two sections: lecture and a laboratory.

Carries natural science divisional credit (with lab) in CAS. Cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title formerly numbered CAS BI 106.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS AN 102
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Introduces basic principles of evolutionary biology, human origins, genetics, reproduction, socio-ecology, and the evolution of primate and human behavior and adaptions. Laboratory sections include examination of fossil and skeletal material, and hands-on projects involving human and primate behavior and biology.

Carries natural science divisional credit (with lab) in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Scientific Inquiry I, Social Inquiry I, Critical Thinking.

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COURSE: CAS BI 114
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

A study of the world’s major human diseases, their causes, effects on history, pathology, and cures. Principles of immunology. Emphasis on present maladies such as AIDS, herpes, cancer, mononucleosis, tuberculosis, influenza, and hepatitis. This course is appropriate for non-majors and students in the health and paramedical sciences. Students must register for two sections: lecture and laboratory.

Carries natural science divisional credit (with lab) in CAS. Not for Biology major or minor credit. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area(s): Scientific Inquiry I, Quantitative Reasoning II, Critical Thinking.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS BI 211
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: ((CAS BI 105 or CAS BI 108) and (CAS BI 106 or CAS BI 210)) or equivalent. Some knowledge of chemistry and anatomy is assumed. Intended mainly for students in health sciences. Not for biology major or minor credit; Biology majors/minors should take CAS BI 315.

Introduction to principles of systemic mammalian physiology with special reference to humans. Students must register for two sections: lecture and laboratory.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: MET CS 632
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

A comprehensive overview of the principles, processes, and practices of software project management. Students learn techniques for planning, organizing, scheduling, and controlling software projects. There is substantial focus on software cost estimation and software risk management. Students obtain practical project management skills and competencies related to the definition of a software project, establishment of project communications, managing project changes, and managing distributed software teams and projects.

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COURSE: QST IS 479
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (QST IS 223).

Surveys the organizational implementation, uses, and impacts of advanced information technology including decision support systems, management support systems, and expert systems. Includes a group project to design and develop a decision support system.

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COURSE: CAS MA 511
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS MA 225 or CAS MA 230).

Fundamental concepts of mathematical reasoning. Properties of the real- number system, elementary point-set theory, metric spaces. Limits, sequences, series, convergence, uniform convergence, continuity. Differentiability for functions of a single variable, Riemann-Stieltjes integration.

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COURSE: CAS CS 330
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS CS 112, CAS CS 131, and CAS CS 132) or (CAS CS 235) or (CAS CS 237).

Examines the basic principles of algorithm design and analysis; graph algorithms; greedy algorithms; dynamic programming; network flows; polynomial-time reductions; NP-hard and NP-complete problems; approximation algorithms; randomized algorithms.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Quantitative Reasoning II, Critical Thinking.

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COURSE: CAS ES 107
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Introduction to Earth as an integrated system composed of interacting biosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, lithosphere, and atmosphere subsystems. Major themes include earth system stability, instability, and capacity for change on all time scales, including human-induced climate change.

Carries natural science divisional credit (with lab) in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Scientific Inquiry I, Quantitative Reasoning I, Research and Information Literacy.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS CS 111
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

The first course for computer science majors and anyone seeking a rigorous introduction. Develops computational problem-solving skills by programming in the Python language and exposes students to a variety of other topics from computer science and its applications.

Carries MCS divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Quantitative Reasoning II, Creativity/Innovation, Critical Thinking.

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COURSE: CAS CS 112
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: (CAS CS 111) or equivalent.

Covers advanced programming techniques and data structures. Topics include recursion, algorithm analysis, linked lists, stacks, queues, trees, graphs, tables, searching, and sorting.

Carries MCS divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Quantitative Reasoning II, Creativity and Innovation, Critical Thinking.

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COURSE: ENG EK 210
CREDITS: 2 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

A two-credit introductory course to the principles of engineering design, intended to give second-year undergraduates a basic understanding of the process of converting a product from concept through design and deployment. Students work in multi-disciplinary teams with time and budget constraints on externally-sponsored design projects. Web-based lectures cover topics concurrent with specific phases of the projects. The course culminates in a “Design Competition.” This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Teamwork/Collaboration.

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COURSE: CAS PS 211
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS PS 101).

Introduction to the logic and processes involved in descriptive and inferential statistics for psychology. Topics include statistical inference, significance, t-tests, ANOVAs, correlation, and statistical software analysis. This is a hybrid class: class time is reserved for hands on activities.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Scientific Inquiry II, Quantitative Reasoning I.

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COURSE: MET CS 432
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Provides a comprehensive overview of IT Project Management and the key processes associated with planning, organizing, and controlling of software projects. The course focuses on various knowledge areas such as project scope management, risk management, quality management, communications management, and integration management. Students are required to submit a term paper.

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COURSE: QST IS 223
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (QST SM 131).

Provides students with an understanding of the important role that information and information technology play in supporting the effective operation and management of business. Elaborates on the themes of “place to space” and the implications for business of the digital enterprise. Focuses on learning IS concepts in the context of application to real business problems.

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COURSE: CAS CS 103
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Introduction to the basic architecture and protocols underlying the operation of the Internet with an emphasis on Web design, Web application programming, and algorithmic thinking. General familiarity with the Internet is assumed.

Carries MCS divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Quantitative Reasoning II, Digital/Multimedia Expression.

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COURSE: CAS MA 142
CREDITS: 2 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Systems of linear equations; matrices. Vector spaces and linear transformations. Determinants. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Applications.

Cannot be taken for credit in addition to CAS MA 242, CAS MA 442, or ENG EK 103.

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COURSE: CAS NE 101
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

An introduction to the biological basis of behavior and cognition. Includes theoretical and practical foundations rooted in psychology, biology, neuropharmacology, and clinical sciences (e.g., neurology and neuropsychiatry). Neuroethical dilemmas are highlighted and integrated when relevant to discussion topics.

Carries natural sciences divisional credit without lab in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Scientific Inquiry I.

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COURSE: CAS MA 341
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS MA 242) or consent of instructor.

Study of integers and basic results of number theory. Topics include Linear Diophantine equations, prime numbers and factorization, congruences, and quadratic reciprocity.

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COURSE: MET CS 201
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Introduction to problem-solving methods and algorithm development. Includes procedural and data abstractions, program design, debugging, testing, and documentation. Covers data types, control structures, functions, parameter passing, library functions, and arrays. Laboratory exercises in Python.

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COURSE: ENG EC 327
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (ENG EK 127 or ENG EK 128).

Introduction to software design, programming techniques, data structures, and software engineering principles. The course is structured bottom up, beginning with basic hardware followed by an understanding of machine language that controls the hardware and the assembly language that organizes that control. It proceeds through fundamental elements of functional programming languages, using C as the case example, and continues with the principles of object-oriented programming, as principally embodied in C++ but also its daughter languages Java, C#, and objective C. The course concludes with an introduction to elementary data structures and algorithmic analysis. Throughout, the course develops core competencies in software engineering, including programming style, optimization, debugging, compilation, and program management, utilizing a variety of Integrated Development Environments and operating systems.

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COURSE: CAS MA 583
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS MA 581 or CAS MA 381) or consent of instructor.

Basic concepts and techniques of stochastic process as they are most often used to construct models for a variety of problems of practical interest. Topics include Markov chains, Poisson process, birth and death processes, queuing theory, renewal processes, and reliability.

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COURSE: CAS MA 150
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

An immersion experience in mathematical thinking and mathematical habits of mind. Students investigate topics in Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry starting from basic elementary material and leading to an overview of current research topics.

Does not satisfy MCS Divisional requirement. Does satisfy CAS WR 150 requirement. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Quantitative Reasoning II, Writing: Research & Inquiry, Research and Information Literacy.

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COURSE: CAS MA 242
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Matrix algebra, solution of linear systems, determinants, Gaussian elimination, fundamental theory, row-echelon form. Vector spaces, bases, norms. Computer methods. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors, canonical decomposition. Applications.

Cannot be taken for credit in addition to CAS MA 142, MA 442, or ENG EK 102.

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COURSE: CAS CS 542
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Introduction to modern machine learning concepts, techniques, and algorithms. Topics include regression, kernels, support vector machines, feature selection, boosting, clustering, hidden Markov models, and Bayesian networks. Programming assignments emphasize taking theory into practice, through applications on real-world data sets.

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COURSE: CAS MA 582
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: (CAS MA 581 or CAS MA 381).

Point estimation including unbiasedness, efficiency, consistency, sufficiency, minimum variance unbiased estimator, Rao-Blackwell theorem, and Rao-Cramer inequality. Maximum likelihood and method of moment estimations; interval estimation; tests of hypothesis, uniformly most powerful tests, uniformly most powerful unbiased tests, likelihood ratio test, and chi-square test.

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COURSE: ENG ME 305
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (ENG EK 301 & ENG EK 103 & CAS MA 226).

Introduction to stress and strain. Axial and shear loading. Torsion of shafts and thin-walled tubes. Stress within and deflection of bending beams. Combined loadings. Stress and strain transformations. Generalized Hooke’s law. Material failure theories. Column buckling. Includes lab and project. Students must register for three sections: lecture, discussion, and laboratory.

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COURSE: QST QM 222
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (QST QM 221 & CAS EC 101). Sophomore standing.

Examines the use of economic and statistical tools for making business decisions. Topics include optimization (including linear programming), multiple regression, demand modeling, cost modeling, industry analysis (including models of perfect competition, monopoly, and oligopoly), and game theory. Emphasizes modeling with spreadsheets.

This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Quantitative Reasoning II.

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COURSE: CAS MA 541
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Basic properties of groups, Sylow theorems, basic properties of rings and ideals, Euclidean rings, polynomial rings.

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COURSE: CAS BI 552
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CASBI203 or CASBI213) and (CASBI206 or CASBI216).

How cells synthesize biologically important macromolecules (DNA, RNA and proteins), as well as their structure, function and regulation. Both prokaryotic and eukaryotic molecular biology is discussed. Topics include: DNA replication, DNA repair, recombination, prokaryotic transcription, translation, eukaryotic transcription/RNA processing, DNaseI hypersensitive sites, 5-methylcytosine, eukaryotic RNA polymerase structure/CTD modification, eukaryotic promoter structure, general transcription factors, enhancer-promoter loops, histone modification/chromatin remodeling, and non- coding RNA. Discussion of important molecular biological techniques, such as genetic and recombinant DNA techniques, including CRISPR/Cas9. Students must attend both lecture and discussion.

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COURSE: CAS MA 225
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: (CAS MA 124 or CAS MA 127 or CAS MA 129).

Vectors, lines, planes. Multiple integration, cylindrical and spherical coordinates. Partial derivatives, directional derivatives, scalar and vector fields, the gradient, potentials, approximation, multivariate minimization, Stokes’s and related theorems.

Cannot be taken for credit in addition to CAS MA 230. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Quantitative Reasoning II.

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COURSE: CAS BI 594 / CAS NE 594
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: Any college-level neuroscience, psychology, or physiology course.

Exploration of the neuroscience of imagination from neurons to memory to neurological control of novel conscious experiences. The course covers what makes the brain and human language unique as well as the selectional forces that shaped the brains of our ancestors. Students must attend both lecture and discussion.

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COURSE: CAS CS 591
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (Graduate standing or permission of instructor. Fundamental knowledge of programming and experience with a high-level programming language (i.e. Java, C++, Python), data structures and basic algorithms.)

Topics in Computer Science. Introduces principles and techniques of object-oriented programming. Focuses on specification, programming, analysis of large-scale, reliable, and reusable Java software using object-oriented design. Includes object models, memory models, inheritance, exceptions, namespaces, data abstraction, design against failure, design patterns, reasoning about objects.

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COURSE: CAS MA 569
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq:((CAS MA 225 or CAS MA 230) & (CAS MA 242 or CAS MA 442)).

Optimization of linear functions: linear programming, simplex method; transportation, assignment, and network problems. Optimization of non-linear functions: unconstrained optima, constrained optima and Lagrange multipliers, Kuhn-Tucker conditions, calculus of variations, and Euler’s equation.

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COURSE: CAS CH 203
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS CH 102 or CAS CH 110 or CAS CH 112). CAS CH 203 and CH 204 meet premedical requirements for organic chemistry.

Fundamentals of contemporary organic chemistry, including skeletal and electronic structure, stereochemistry, and reactions of important functional groups. Applications of organic reactions to important synthetic targets in materials and drug discovery are highlighted, as are reactions pertinent to biochemistry. Laboratory includes training in basic organic chemistry skills, such as extraction, reaction performance, spectroscopy interpretation, and chromatography. Students must register for four sections: lecture, discussion, prelab, and laboratory.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Scientific Inquiry I, Quantitative Reasoning I.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS CH 204
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS CH 203).

Fundamentals of contemporary chemistry, including electronic structure, stereochemistry, and reactions of important functional groups, reaction mechanisms, stereochemistry, and multistep synthesis. Laboratory includes extraction, reactions, spectroscopy, and chromatography. Students must register for four sections: lecture, discussion, prelab, and laboratory.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS CH 220
CREDITS: 2 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS CH 204).

Laboratory methods in organic chemistry including multistep synthesis, organic qualitative analysis, and instrumental analysis. Students must register for two sections: lecture and laboratory. Meets with CAS CH 214 prelab and laboratory.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS CH 205
CREDITS: 3 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS CH 102) or equivalent.

Fundamentals of contemporary organic chemistry, including skeletal and electronic structure, stereochemistry, and reactions of important functional groups. Applications of organic reactions to important synthetic targets in materials and drug discovery are highlighted, as are reactions pertinent to biochemistry.

Not acceptable for credit toward the chemistry major or minor. For students who do not require laboratory credit. Students must register for two sections: lecture and discussion.

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COURSE: CAS CH 206
CREDITS: 3 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS CH 203 or CAS CH 205).

Fundamentals of contemporary chemistry, including electronic structure, stereochemistry, and reactions of important functional groups, reaction mechanisms, stereochemistry, and multistep synthesis.

Not acceptable for credit toward the chemistry major or minor. For students who do not require laboratory credit. Students must register for two sections: lecture and discussion.

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COURSE: CAS CH 214
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS CH 203).

Fundamentals of contemporary chemistry, including electronic structure, stereochemistry, and reactions of important functional groups, reaction mechanisms, stereochemistry, and multistep synthesis. Laboratory includes extraction, reactions, spectroscopy, and chromatography.

Students must register for four sections: lecture, discussion, prelab, and laboratory. Lecture and discussion sections meet with CAS CH 204 lecture and discussion sections. This course with the more advanced lab is suitable for chemistry or BMB concentrators.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS CH 373
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS BI 105 or CAS BI 108 or CAS NE 102 or ENG BE 208) and (CAS CH 204 or CAS CH 214 or CAS CH 212 or CAS CH 174) or equivalent.

Introductory biochemistry focusing on structure/function with applications to medicine, nutrition, and biotechnology, including acid/base chemistry, protein structure, enzyme mechanisms, thermodynamics, and kinetics; nucleic acid structure/function, lipids and carbohydrates; bioenergetics of glycolysis and oxidative energy metabolism; lipid and nitrogen metabolism. Students must register for two sections: lecture and a discussion.

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COURSE: CAS CH 171
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Introduction to chemistry: separation and purification of matter, atomic theory, structure of atoms, molecules and chemical bonding, chemical formulas, equations, stoichiometry; water, solutions, concentration, acids, bases, pH and buffers; gases; reaction kinetics and equilibrium, and radioactivity. Students must register for three sections: lecture, discussion, and laboratory.

Carries natural science divisional credit (with lab) in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Scientific Inquiry I, Quantitative Reasoning I.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS BI 325
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS BI 203) or consent of instructor.

Fundamentals of the nervous system, emphasizing synaptic transmission; hierarchical organization; autonomic nervous system; mechanisms of sensory perception; reflexes and motor function; biorhythms; and neural mechanisms of feeding, mating, learning, and memory. Students must register for two sections: lecture and discussion.

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COURSE: QST QM 221
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Exposes students to the fundamentals of probability, decision analysis, and statistics, and their application to business. Topics include probability, decision analysis, distributions, sampling, estimation, hypothesis testing, and chi-square.

This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Quantitative Reasoning I.

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COURSE: CAS MA 581
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: (CAS MA 225 or CAS MA 230) or consent of instructor.

Basic probability, conditional probability, independence. Discrete and continuous random variables, mean and variance, functions of random variables, moment generating function. Jointly distributed random variables, conditional distributions, independent random variables. Methods of transformations, law of large numbers, central limit theorem.

Cannot be taken for credit in addition to CAS MA 381.

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COURSE: CAS CS 237
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS CS 131).

Introduction to basic probabilistic concepts and methods used in computer science. Develops an understanding of the crucial role played by randomness in computing, both as a powerful tool and as a challenge to confront and analyze. Emphasis on rigorous reasoning, analysis, and algorithmic thinking.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Quantitative Reasoning II, Critical Thinking.

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COURSE: MET CS 231
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (MET CS 201) or instructor’s consent.

Covers the elements of object-oriented programming and the C++ language. Data types, control structures, functions, library functions, classes, inheritance, and multiple inheritance. Use of constructors, destructors, function and operator overloading, reference parameters and default values, friend functions, input and output streams, templates, and exceptions.

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COURSE: MET CS 232
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: (MET CS 201) or instructor’s consent.

Covers the elements of object-oriented programming and the Java Programming Language. Primitive data types, control structures, methods, classes, arrays and strings, inheritance and polymorphism, interfaces, creating user interfaces, applets, exceptions and streams.

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COURSE: CAS CH 201
CREDITS: 2 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS CH 102).

Principles of quantitative analysis and instrumental analysis. Introduction to error analysis, basic statistics, quantitative lab skills, basic statistics, acid-base chemistry, chromatography, and electronic spectroscopy (atomic and molecular UV, AAS). Lab exercises apply concepts in redox chemistry, acid/base reactions, transition metal chemistry, and other general chemistry topics. Students must register for two sections: lecture and laboratory.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS MA 115
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Numerical and graphical summaries of univariate and bivariate data. Basic probability, random variables, binomial distribution, normal distribution. One-sample statistical inference for normal means and binomial probabilities.

Primarily for students in the social sciences with limited mathematics preparation. MA 115 may not be taken for credit by any student who has completed any MA course numbered 300 or higher. Students may receive credit for not more than one of the following courses: CAS MA 113, MA 115, or MA 213. Carries MCS divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Quantitative Reasoning II.

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COURSE: CAS MA 116
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: (CAS MA 115) or equivalent.

Introduces basic statistical modeling techniques. One- or two-sample inference for unknown means, proportions and variances, categorical data analysis, introduction to design of experiments and analysis of variance, analysis of simple and multiple linear regression models, non-parametric methods.

MA 116 may not be taken for credit by any student who has completed any MA course numbered 300 or higher. Students may receive credit for not more than one of the following courses: CAS MA 116, MA 214, or MA 614. Carries MCS divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Quantitative Reasoning II.

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COURSE: CAS BI 315
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS BI 108 or ENG BE 209) and (CAS CH 101) and (CAS CH 102) or equivalent.

An introduction to physiological principles applied across all levels of organization (cell, tissue, organ system). Preparation for more advanced courses in physiology. Topics include homeostasis and neural, muscle, respiratory, cardiovascular, renal, endocrine, gastrointestinal, and metabolic physiology. Students must register for two sections: lecture and laboratory.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS AS 102
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

The birth and death of stars. Red giants, white dwarfs, black holes. Our galaxy, the Milky Way, and other galaxies. The Big Bang and other cosmological theories of our expanding universe. Use of the observatory. Students must register for two sections: lecture and laboratory.

Carries natural science divisional credit (with lab) in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Scientific Inquiry I, Quantitative Reasoning I, Teamwork/Collaboration.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS AN 263
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

An exploration of female behavioral biology focusing on evolutionary, physiological, and biosocial aspects of women’s lives from puberty through pregnancy, birth, lactation, menopause, and aging. Examples are drawn from traditional and industrialized societies, and data from nonhuman primates are considered.

Counts for Natural Science credit; as a Biology – Specialization in Behavioral Biology – elective; and towards the Women’s, Gender, & Sexuality Studies minor. Carries natural science divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Scientific Inquiry I, Social Inquiry I, Critical Thinking.

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COURSE: CAS MA 267
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS MA 121 or CAS MA 123) or consent of instructor.

The goal of this course is to develop models for sustainability. “Just-in- time” mathematics/statistics techniques are taught with immediate application, for example: geometry for flight routes; graph theory for social networks; linear algebra for operations research; fractal measures for earthquakes and tsunamis.

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COURSE: CAS AS 101
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

The historical development of astronomy and the motion of the planets. The formation of the solar system. The sun and its effects on the earth. Description of the planets and the moons of our solar system, including recent results from the space program. Use of the observatory. Students must register for two sections: lecture and laboratory.

Carries natural science divisional credit (with lab) in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area(s): Scientific Inquiry I, Quantitative Reasoning I, Critical Thinking.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: MET UA 510
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Special Topics in Urban Affairs. As rates of urbanization continue to increase, there is amplified demand for housing, economic development, and connectivity through transportation networks. This course unpacks ‘sustainable development’ by focusing on strategies and best practices at the intersection of zoning and land use patterns with sustainable transportation options (e.g., subway, bus, rapid transit, biking, and walking). Students learn how to address sustainable development and transportation issues at the local, state, regional, and national levels. Case studies are used to address central issues many cities are facing. Topics covered include stakeholder engagement, climate change preparedness and adaptation, resilience planning, transportation networks, bikeshare and bikeable networks, walkability, equity, sustainable land use, and zoning.

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Excursions

Included in your program fees is one excursion led by your local CISaustralia Site Director. Past excursions have included the New England Aquarium and Boston Tea Party Museum.

Boston University Summer Term also organizes several activities and events for students to attend during their time at the University. Some examples are Red Sox games, outlet shopping trips and beach outings. BU has many student-run clubs on campus that often host events for students and allow students to get involved in.

The city is filled with National Historic Sites and some of the oldest streets, buildings, shops, and public gardens in the United States. Boston serves as a beacon of American history and growth. During your free time, you may also choose to visit the following on your own:

  • Boston Commons – The oldest city park in The United States! There are free events, excellent running paths and it’s a great place to relax in a busy city.
  • Faneuil Hall & Quincy Markets – Shops, restaurants and some of the best clam chowder in Boston. Set amongst the market is Faneuil Hall, one of Boston’s most historic and notable buildings.
  • New England Aquarium – Located near Faneuil Hall and Quincy Market, this aquarium has a plethora of animals, exhibits and events.
  • Fenway Park – The iconic and oldest baseball stadium in the US, Fenway is home to the Red Sox. No trip to Boston is complete without seeing a game.
  • House of Blues – An iconic centrepiece of the vibrant music scene in Boston. Be sure to go to a concert here and experience the amazing acoustics and intimate setting. Located across the street from Fenway, it’s in a great location.
  • Newbury Street and Back Bay – Newbury Street is Boston’s most enchanting street. It has all the latest fashion, restaurants, cafes, art galleries and theatres. Located in the Back Bay area, it’s near the water where you can grab a bite to eat and walk along the shore.
  • Beacon Hill – A historic neighbourhood in Boston near the Back Bay area. The neighbourhood is famous for its old style narrow streets, illuminated by gaslight torches and brick sidewalks.
  • Freedom Trail – A path winding through downtown Boston that passes by 16 historical locations significant to the history of the United States.
  • Boston Light – The second oldest lighthouse in the United States. It is a designated national Historic Landmark and there are tours available to visit the island and the inside of the lighthouse.

Location

Boston University lies in the heart of one of the most dynamic cities in the world! The epicentre of New England, the city is a crossroads of ideas, cultures, opportunities and limitless experiences.

BU campus is only a short subway ride from all the biggest sports venues, restaurants, shopping and downtown areas. Every neighbourhood in the Greater Boston area has its own feel and unique and vibrant culture. Whatever you are looking for, you will be able to find it in Boston, from cultural events to the latest gallery exhibit and concerts galore!

Boston is full of history, and Bostonians are proud of the impact their city has had on the narrative of The United States. The regional clam chowder is a must while in Boston, as is a visit to the Boston Aquarium. The city has a fantastic mix of tourist attractions, local pubs and restaurants, world-class entertainment and city pride!

A few facts about the city of Boston:

  • The Boston Common is the oldest public park in the US. It’s been around since 1634!
  • The first US Thanksgiving Day was celebrated in Plymouth, MA in 1621
  • The Boston University Bridge is a unique structure
  • Fenway Park, home of the Red Sox, opened in 1912 and is the oldest baseball stadium still in use
  • Boston is home to 600,000 residents and over 250,000 students
  • Greater Boston is home to approx. 4.5 million residents
  • Many people from Boston are proud American Irish, and the Irish culture is pervasive in the city’s festivals, holidays and lifestyle
  • The Boston Cream Pie was invented in the city and is the Massachusetts State dessert – yum!
  • There is always something to do in Boston! It is small enough to walk around from one major attraction to the next, but large enough to be a centre of entertainment and culture

Kenmore Square – Home of BU

Located in the centre of the city, Kenmore Square is close to Fenway Park, shops, Boston nightlife and the subway station to get anywhere you need to. With such a central location, you will not miss out on anything Boston has to offer. As a result of its continual expansion and ever-growing student population, the University contains an array of architecturally diverse classrooms, halls and dormitories. This makes BU a gorgeous centrepiece of the city, and welcoming students to learn, while enjoying a tranquil atmosphere in a rather busy city.

Boston has a fantastic public transportation system of buses, subways and trains. It is easy to get from one side of town to the other, and with regular transport available to get out of the city, you have the opportunity to visit nearby cities, towns and states.

The University

BU has been a pillar in education and the Boston community since its establishment in 1839. In 2018, Boston University was ranked 37th of National Universities. It is an institution that takes pride in its diversity, innovation and research. The classroom is not only a place to learn at BU, it is a place to create and ignite students’ imaginations. There is no doubt that BU offers students the tools to excel and build!

BU is a university built on celebrated thinkers, extraordinary teaching and world class students. Students work alongside professors who have won Nobel Prizes, are poets laureate, Pulitzer Prize Winners, Fulbright Scholars and other prestigious honours.

While in class you might find yourself sitting next to a student that has interned at NASA, designed costumes for Broadway shows, received an Emmy nomination for their original composition, trained puppies to become guide dogs or sold hand planes made from repurposed wood for body surfing. The diverse and dynamic student population are a perfect showcase of the University.

The BU recreation centre or ‘FitRec’ is a perfect place to get in shape and have fun! The FitRec offers students dance classes, rock climbing, martial arts, yoga and pilates, just to name a few. They have on site pools, an ice rink (only in winter sorry!), a sports arena and they host events frequently. Due to their prime location near the Charles River, which flows through Boston, you will often see students training for their Rowing or Sailing teams.

The BU campus is in a superb location with accessible and economical transport available to explore the region. The campus is well maintained, the facilities world class and the student body welcoming. Situated right on the Charles River students will find the tranquillity of the water and proximity a fantastic perk of BU.

As a BU ‘summer’ (July) session student you have hundreds of academic courses to choose from, high standard accommodation and full access to the university facilities, including 24 libraries, 6 art galleries and theatres, a recreation centre and student union. Set in the centre of Boston you will always have something to do, a place to study, an enormous variety of food to try and people to meet.

With the University’s location in the heart of Boston there are multiple ATM and banking options, a post office, hair salon, multiple computer labs and several libraries – all just a short walk from your accommodation.

Wireless Internet access is available in all academic classrooms, dining facilities and undergraduate residences on-campus for users with an eligible BU Login ID and appropriate wireless network interface card. There is also cable TV and computer network connections in each room of the on-campus accommodation.

BU has a full-time, on-campus Police Department, that conduct campus patrols 24 hours a day, and spans over a 132 acre area of University-owned property. In the surrounding metropolitan area there is support from the Boston and Brookline Police Departments. There are also on-campus call boxes that serve as emergency locations for students to contact the police. The BU “TerrierCard” will be your personal security pass for getting into your residence hall.

BU has its own on-campus Health Centre for students. The Health Centre serves students through a range of programs and offers many resources like women’s health care, GP services, minor office procedures and nutritional services. Nearby there are several premier U.S. hospitals that can assist students and provide additional medical care.

Back Bay and Newbury Street are a short 15 minute walk from the Boston University campus. Fenway is just as close, and students can take a short 5 minute walk to find themselves at a game, and near the iconic House of Blues. The area around the University is focused on students, and will regularly offer deals and sales on food, shops and trips for students.

Your student ID is called a ‘TerrierCard’ and it is your passport to life at BU. It serves many purposes and the convenience of all the included features makes it a must-have necessity. You will receive this card once you arrive at BU.

‘TerrierCard’ features and functions include:

  • Official university ID
  • Pre-paid debit feature can be used for purchases at campus stores
  • Library card to check out materials and pay for copies and printing
  • Campus gym and recreational facilities pass (for a small additional fee per month)
  • Access card for on-campus housing residential buildings
  • Meal card for meal swipes at any of the residential restaurants in on-campus housing
  • Laundry card for all University housing facilities
  • Transportation card for BU Shuttle Bus transportation

Note: The terrier is the official mascot of BU! Try to see if you can grab a picture with him during an official BU event.

Accommodation

The university provides comfortably furnished dormitory-style and apartment-style accommodation within an easy walking distance of classrooms, libraries, recreational centres, and downtown Boston.

The on-campus accommodation is in a prime location – students love the atmosphere and ease of getting in and out of the city. Accommodation is offered on a first in best dressed scenario – so be sure to apply well ahead of our deadline so we can confirm your accommodation placement.

Students can choose from two accommodation options:

1. On-campus dormitory-style accommodation

Residence Hall rooms are shared by 2-3 students (per room). Single rooms are available for an additional fee. Please request upon application to the program. Each room includes a bed, desk, chair, dresser, cupboard and drawer space for each student. Students live on co-ed floors with designated male and female community restrooms with private showers located on each floor. There are also cable TV and computer network connections in each room. A refrigerator rental service is available to students when they arrive. A meal plan of 10 meals is included in your program fees for on-campus accommodation (only). There is a convenience store on campus as well to purchase other basic foods.

2. On-campus apartment-style accommodation 

Apartments often vary from one to six students per apartment (2-3 bedrooms), and can be single or shared rooms. There are an assortment of sizes and floor plans, but each apartment is fully furnished and comes with kitchen facilities, bathrooms and a shared common area. Rooms come with a bed, desk, chair, dresser, and cupboard and drawer space. Students are responsible for bringing or buying all their necessary bed linens, as well as kitchen utensils, cleaning items and bathroom supplies, which can often be split between flatmates. Students in apartment style residences have the option of purchasing a dining plan or supplying their own food.

There is a large ‘Bed, Bath and Beyond’ store close to campus (walking distance) that students can visit and obtain whatever they need in relation to towels, linen, pillows, etc.

Other Amenities

A refrigerator rental service is available to students when they arrive for on-campus accommodation. Coin-operated laundry facilities are located in several areas on-campus. If you choose to purchase a television, basic cable television service is provided to all rooms on-campus.

Dining Services

The fees for on-campus University dormitory style accommodation include meals (10 per week) at various student dining halls, which begin with dinner on the Sunday evening before classes start and end with breakfast on the last Saturday of check-out.

Smoking

Smoking in on- and off-campus housing, classrooms and all campus facilities is prohibited.

Code of Conduct

All on-campus accommodation has a code of conduct that students must adhere to – this includes policies related to alcohol and drugs. Note: The USA has laws that mean students under the age of 21 are not legally allowed to drink. This naturally applies to on-campus accommodation.

Program Fee & Dates

Session 1: May-June 2020
Application Deadline23 March 2020
Arrival Date20 May 2020
Departure Date01 July 2020
Program Fee A$ 11,999 - 13,999
OS-HELP A$ 6,913
Session 2: July-August 2020
Application Deadline07 May 2020
Arrival Date06 July 2020
Departure Date14 August 2020
Program Fee A$ 11,999 - 13,999
OS-HELP A$ 6,913

 

Program fees include the following:
  • Tuition fees – 6-week program (2 courses = 8 US credits)*
  • CISaustralia support services before, during, and after the program
  • Academic advising
  • Financial advice
  • Assistance with travel arrangements
  • Medical and accident insurance (if requested)
  • Pre-departure guide and session
  • Airport pick-up (on specified program arrival date within designated arrival times)
  • All additional BU registration, orientation and document fees
  • Accommodation for duration of program
  • All on-campus dormitory rooms have a built in meal plan of 10 meals per week**
  • On-campus internet
  • Access to gym, pool, library, multiply eateries
  • Selected excursions and / or cultural activities
  • CISaustralia 24/7 on-site support – Site Director
  • BU official transcript
  • CISaustralia Certificate of Completion

*CREDIT Note: Students could opt to undertake more than 8 US credits, however, there will be an additional tuition charge for this. CISaustralia would not recommend a study load any larger than 8 US credits (typically 2 courses) during your program. Please note that additional lab, service fees and/or additional credit fees may apply to your Boston University enrolment. These fees will be charged by BU to CISaustralia, who will in turn pass these fees onto each CISaustralia student. Additional lab fees will not normally apply to standard courses in business or humanities. Additional fees could be applied for the following:

  • Students will be charged additional tuition fees for any additional credits studied over and above the standard 8 US credits for the CISaustralia July in Boston program, and / or
  • Laboratory fees that might be associated with lab classes. Lab fees are likely to exist for science, engineering (or similar) related courses. Lab fees are not included in the standard program fee and students might expect to pay an additional amount of approx. A$300 per course (fees fluctuate per course and are implemented by Boston University without discussion or negotiation).
  • Additional tuition fees may apply for courses considered postgraduate. These courses are generally indicated by the class number (500 or higher) and students can expect to pay an approx. amount of A$800 – A$1,000 per course depending on which faculty the course is associated with.

Students are required to pay for any additional lab or credit fees, and will be invoiced by CISaustralia. For most courses students will be invoiced before the start of their program, however if students arrive to campus and add/drop courses before the deadline, fees could apply. Students should select courses carefully and note the US credit weighting for each course. The CISaustralia program to Boston in July only includes up to and including 8 US credits (normally 2 x 4 US credit courses). Students who choose courses with a higher US credit weighting, i.e. more than 8 US credits for two courses, will be charged at approx. $800 per additional US credit (pending current exchange rates). This fee can be calculated before the student arrives if more than 8 US Credits are chosen. This fee can also be calculated after the student’s first week at BU (the BU add / drop period) and CISaustralia will invoice all students directly after week one of the program for any additional US credits or lab fees. BU transcripts will be available once all fees have been paid in full to CISaustralia.

**MEALS Note: Meal plans are available (10, 14 and 19 meals per week). For pricing or further information, contact your CISaustralia Program Advisor.

What is not included:

  • Flights
  • Travel insurance
  • Visa fees
  • Vaccinations (if required)
  • Meals (unless mentioned above)
  • Extra travel/excursions (other than those mentioned above)

Students should expect to pay approx. A$500 for their student visa, pending the exchange rate ($AUD to $USD). The visa fee of approx. A$500 includes 3 different components – a US Government visa application fee, a US Government Issuance Fee and the US Government ‘Student and Exchange Visitor Information System’ (SEVIS) fee. US Government student visa fees are regulated by the US Government and are subject to change without notice. CISaustralia cannot charge or collect fees for the US student visa.

Possible additional fees include: Laboratory Fee for science courses: approx. A$240. Replacement Fee (for ID card): approx. A$36. Late Payment of Fees: approx. A$90-360.

Dates are for reference only and are subject to change. Please do not book flights until you have received the confirmed dates in your acceptance paperwork.

CISaustralia reserves the right to alter fees at any time due to currency fluctuations and/or fee changes made by our partner universities.

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